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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Carolina Gardener Vol. 29 Issue 4, May 2017
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Record #:
34809
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bacterial spot and bacterial speck have both become large issues for many regions across North and South Carolina. It mostly materializes on tomato plants but can also spread to peppers and eggplants if not properly treated. Spraying and planting in pots can help deter bacterial rot in plants.
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Record #:
34811
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nan and Saul Chase have cultivated a once-bare plot in Asheville into a thriving kitchen garden. All plants within the tiny .09 acre lot are edible, and include hot peppers, crabapples, berry bushes, and other varieties of vegetable.
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Record #:
34810
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blueberries are a hardy, versatile fruit-bearing shrub that does well in the Carolinas. This article outlines the ways to grow and care for blueberry bushes and which variety to choose in each climate.
Source:
Carolina Gardener (NoCar SB 453.2 N8 C37), Vol. 29 Issue 4, May 2017, p54-55, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
36201
Author(s):
Abstract:
The presence of pollinators is of increased concern for scientists, gardeners, and farmers, due to decreased pollinator populations worldwide. For a pollinator friendly garden, the author recommended flowers preferable to pollinators such as Passion vine, Milkweed, Coneflower, and Dahlia. Other factors to consider are a protective environment and ample water sources.
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Record #:
36199
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Abstract:
This type of garden can nourish all, by lowering harmful insect populations and maintaining pollinator populations. Plants nourishing for farm animals include Artemisia and marigold. Examples of plants nourishing for humans are sponge gourd and sheep sorrel. Plants discouraging pests are bay laurel and mint. Plants good for insects include spicebush and dill.
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Record #:
36202
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Tradescant the Younger is credited for finding plants such as the Virginia Creeper and Spiderwort, with the latter having his contribution reflected in its Latin name, Tradescantia virginiana. Along with being a popular garden plant, Spiderwort can be found in abandoned farms and homesteads, a testament to their former importance in agrarian life.
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Record #:
36200
Abstract:
Essential to garden growth are pollinators, or creatures involved in plant pollination. Examples of insect pollinators are the mason bee and flower fly. Mammal pollinators include hummingbirds. To keep them replenishing the plant supply, the author suggested diversifying the types of flowers by type and shape.
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