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4 results for Carolina Country Vol. 12 Issue 9, Sept 1980
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Record #:
8614
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Abstract:
Artists are painting murals on the sides of buildings in a number of North Carolina towns. The murals are specific to the communities and the people who live there. In 1976-1977, Asheboro had a mural painted as part of its bicentennial celebration. The mural depicts a street scene from the turn of the century, complete with plank road and a bicycle-built-for-two. Cynvia Arthur, who was Randolph County's artist-in-residence, was the lead artist, assisted by artists Louise Culler and Audrey Beck. The mural took eighteen months from design to completion.
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Record #:
31534
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Abstract:
North Carolina electric cooperatives could be awarded federal funds for preliminary work on a demonstration peat-fired generating plant under legislation adopted recently by Congress. The legislation allocates funds for first-stage design and engineering on such a plant, which would be the first such facility in the United States. The proposed demonstration plant would provide vital information regarding the practical approaches to tapping this energy source and the environmental effects of harvesting and burning peat.
Record #:
31535
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Abstract:
The Folk Art Center on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Asheville, which opened earlier this year, is a major regional educational and activity center for the crafts and folklore of the Southern Highlands. Craftsmen regularly demonstrate their workmanship at the center, and folk dancing, folk music and film presentations are part of its regular schedule.
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Record #:
31536
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Abstract:
Indians were the original Tar Heels, for their roots in North Carolina go back hundreds of years before the territory was claimed by European settlers. In recognition of that history, Governor James B. Hunt, Jr. has proclaimed September 20-26 as Indian Heritage Week in North Carolina. From the Cherokee Reservation in the west to the Waccamaw-Siouan tribal area in the southeast section of the state, statewide observances will celebrate the history and contributions of North Carolina Indians with various events and festivities.
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