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5 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 25 Issue 10, Oct 2005
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Record #:
7426
Abstract:
Eastern North Carolina is an area of contrasts. The coastline draws tourists' dollars and million-dollar homes dot the beaches, while large sections of the interior are mired in poverty. Twelve of the region's forty-one counties lost population between 2000 and 2004. Charles Broadwell, publisher of the FAYETTEVILLE OBSERVER; Jim Chestnutt, CEO of Washington-based National Spinning Co.; Tom Eagar, Wilmington-based CEO of the N.C. Ports Authority; Phillip Horne, president of Greenville-based Foundation of Renewal for Eastern North Carolina; and Darlene Waddell, executive director of the N.C. Global TransPark Authority in Kinston discuss with BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA senior editor Edward Martin the region's strengths and weaknesses and how to orient the region's assets to promote growth.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 25 Issue 10, Oct 2005, p66-69, 71, 73-79, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7425
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Bob Jackson of Cary is senior vice president and general manager of McDonald Corporation's Raleigh Region. He oversees 665 restaurants and 32,000 employees in a region that stretches from Kentucky to Georgia and from Tennessee east to the Atlantic Ocean. McDonald's Corporation is divided into eight regions nationwide. Since 2003, the Raleigh Region has ranked in the top three in sales and customers. Sales for 2004 were over $1 billion, and each restaurant in the region served over 500,000 customers.
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Record #:
7428
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A strike canceled the hockey season for 2004-2005, and a settlement was finally reached in July 2005. When professional sports teams go on strike, a drop in fan attendance is typical for the following season. Raleigh's National Hockey League team, the Carolina Hurricanes, hope the fans haven't forgotten them. Roush discusses some things owners are planning to attract fans. Hockey fans say putting a competitive Hurricane team on the ice will bring them back.
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Record #:
7427
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NASCAR racing is big business. Racing teams require over $15 million a year to keep their cars in competition. Primary sponsors of teams, like Mooresville-based Lowe's, pay up to $10 million a season, and secondary sponsors pay up to $1 million. In return, the sponsors get their logos displayed on the racing cars and the drivers' outfits. Sponsors believe the money is a good advertising investment since the thirty-six NASCAR Nextel Cup races attract over thirteen million fans, besides the 200 million who view the four-hour races on television.
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Record #:
7424
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using 2004 revenues, the Grant Thornton Accounting Firm ranked the state's top 100 private companies for BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA. Participation by companies is voluntary. Distribution and manufacturing companies continue to dominate the list. Five of the top ten companies that grossed in excess of $500 million were manufacturers. Two of the top ten were distributors. General Parts, Inc., of Raleigh, a distributor of replacement parts for vehicles, retained its No. 1 ranking from 2004.
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