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5 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 20 Issue 5, May 2000
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Record #:
4546
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Virginia's and South Carolina's ports do twice the business of North Carolina's two ports of Morehead City and Wilmington. To make the port of Wilmington competitive, North Carolina and the federal government will begin a project in July 2000 to deepen the port and 26 miles of river from 38 to 42 feet. The five-year project will cost $339 million. When the project is completed, 85 percent of the world's commercial fleet can sail into Wilmington. Some, however, feel dredging will not help, since Wilmington lacks the natural advantages of the other ports.
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Record #:
4554
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Elizabeth Norris first became interested in tablecloths for handbell tables thirty years ago, when she attended a handbell festival and saw that many groups covered their tables with old sheets. It was not until 1985 that she started Custom Coverings out of her home in Waynesville. Today the company is still the world's only commercial maker of handbell table coverings. In 1999, her 12-employee company processed over 1,800 orders with revenues of $600,000.
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Record #:
4547
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Contractors do not lack projects in North Carolina. What they lack is a timely supply of building materials. Nationwide, a nine-year economic expansion and a heavy demand for new construction help suppliers' keep plants running at their maximum and beyond. Even with supply difficulties, the state's top thirty contractors saw revenues increase 4 percent to around $3.3 billion in 1999.
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Record #:
4548
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Tim and Tick Clancy are CEO and COO of Clancy & Theys Construction Company in Raleigh. Their company is the state's seventh-largest construction company with earnings of $284.5 million in 1999. The brothers' office facilities are modest, without the usual CEO trappings, and they operate their company the old-fashioned way: tell the truth; make no excuses; give the customer what he wants; and let the work speak for itself.
Record #:
4549
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank Gentry, who retired from Bank of America Corp. in January 2000 as the bank's top corporate strategist, discusses his career, the bank, and how bank acquisitions are made.
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