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17 results for Business North Carolina Vol. 15 Issue 2, Feb 1995
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Record #:
2125
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Abstract:
Deregulation of the utilities industry is challenging Duke Power and CP&L to provide earnings while facing competition from other power sources, rate-shopping by local industries, and services offered by out-of-state companies.
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Record #:
2122
Author(s):
Abstract:
While agricultural and manufacturing jobs have declined over the last twenty years, such other job sectors as government, retail, and service have grown, enabling the state to post a $650 million trade surplus
Record #:
2121
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Abstract:
The state's 100 counties are divided into seven economic regions for the purpose of promoting each region to attract prospective employers. Regional financing comes from local and state governments and businesses.
Record #:
2123
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Abstract:
With a combination of traditional products, like tobacco, and new crops such as broccoli and farm-raised trout, state farmers netted a record $5 billion from $41 billion in gross sales. The state now ranks ninth among farm states.
Record #:
2124
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Abstract:
Although the number of banks in North Carolina declined from 78 in 1993 to 69 in June 1994, mergers are enabling institutions to expand. Large banks can offer better services, protect themselves from takeovers, and better operate outside the state.
Record #:
2137
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Competition among hospitals is helping to moderate rising health-care costs in the state. Shorter hospital stays, alliances with nursing homes, and purchase of physician practices by hospitals are contributing to this trend.
Record #:
2136
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The state is working to bring public schools to a level comparable with the university system and is focusing on such areas as dropouts, reducing class size, capital outlays, improved communication skills, and math.
Record #:
2135
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Compared to 1993, commercial construction is up 20% in 1994 with the $160 million Carolinas Stadium in Charlotte leading the way. Home building is also strong, and contractors in the Triad, Triangle and Charlotte are having to compete for skilled workers
Record #:
2141
Author(s):
Abstract:
While major funding for the North Carolina Information Highway is moving slowly in the legislature, high-tech industries, such as telecommunications and electronics, continue to expand. Statistics reveal facts about companies and employment.
Record #:
2140
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to American Furniture Manufacturers Association in High Point, the industry shipped $19.8 billion in furniture in 1994. New home sales, remodeling, and home refinancing money will foster the demand for furniture in 1995.
Record #:
2144
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite differing opinions between insurance companies and Insurance Commissioner Jim Long over rate increases and refunds, revenues rose in 1993 for companies offering homeowners, auto, and general liability insurance.
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Record #:
2156
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's one-hundred largest employers, which range in size from 25,000 to 2,200 workers, are publicly, privately, and foreign owned. They offer such products and services as pizza, pulp, and poultry processing.
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Record #:
2152
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Textile revenues have fluctuated for state mills as consumers put their money into durable goods in 1994 and costs for raw materials increased. However, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is seen as a boost to revenues from increased trade.
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Record #:
2148
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the first half of 1994, the value of single-family residential construction was over $2.7 billion statewide, up ten percent from 1993, as buyers took advantage of low mortgage rates and contractors began community sites of 2,000 to 4,000 homes.
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Record #:
2149
Author(s):
Abstract:
Segments of the state's transportation industry experienced mixed financial results in 1994, with various aviation and trucking companies having unsettled years, while ports like Morehead City and Wilmington increased shipping volume.
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