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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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375 results for "Water Resources Research Institute News"
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Record #:
34366
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Chlorination of drinking water has been linked to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that can be harmful to human health. Tackling this problem has created myriad dilemmas for regulatory agencies, utility operations and the public at large. This article discusses the issue in North Carolina, alternative treatment technologies and strategies taken by the City of Durham.
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34365
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North Carolina is facing the possibility of having to conserve its public water supplies to protect against an uncertain rainfall-streamflow pattern over the next several months. As the state continues to experience rapid growth, demand for public water supplies tends to follow closely. This article discusses water supplies in Wake and Mecklenburg counties and the use of quarries for expanding reservoir capacity.
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34367
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Scientists say that the most important and predictable water-related impacts of climate change on North Carolina is rising sea level. This has impacts on rainfall and streamflow, on which much of North Carolina’s water supplies are dependent. This article discusses the consensus of scientists and predictions in North Carolina.
Record #:
34369
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On December 20, at the North Carolina Drought Management Advisory Council meeting, Governor Mike Easley stated he will bring thirty of the state’s worst hit water systems together on January 14, in Greensboro to review the status of these systems. The council will review plans for the drought and reserve sources of water.
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34368
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North Carolina is experiencing a severe drought, and cities are questioning how bad its effects will be on public water supplies. This article discusses records of previous droughts in North Carolina and how conservation of water resources was addressed.
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Record #:
34363
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A new Emergency Operations Center for North Carolina and a state emergency response fund to be tapped during hurricanes and other natural disasters are urgent necessities identified by the Joint Study Committee on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management Recovery. Eleven legislative proposals are being introduced during the General Assembly short session to fulfill these needs.
Record #:
34361
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Given the experiences in North Carolina over the past decade with devastating hurricanes, there is concern over the protection of water supplies and how the state should respond to natural disasters, accidents, or contamination. This article discusses policies and emergency management in North Carolina.
Record #:
34362
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North Carolina has an average annual rainfall of forty inches, but in recent years, widespread drought has raised concern over the abundance of water supplies. This article examines the current state of water supply and water use in North Carolina.
Record #:
34364
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North Carolina experienced a string of debilitating natural disasters over a five-year period beginning with Hurricane Floyd in 1999, and the response to some of these crises is still ongoing in many places. Government leaders and industries are cooperating to try to fix the policy and planning failures that exacerbated damages. Revised, comprehensive floodplain mapping is one of the preventative actions that emerged as a direct result of Hurricane Floyd.
Record #:
7344
Abstract:
David H. Moreau, a UNC-Chapel Hill professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning, has once again been named director of the Water Resources Research Institute of UNC effective July 1, 2005. Moreau, who was WRRI director from 1983 to 1995, has been a UNC faculty member since 1968.
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Record #:
8181
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The summer of 2005 will mark the tenth anniversary of massive algae blooms and fish kills on the lower Neuse River caused by excessive nitrogen and phosphate loading in the Neuse estuary. Bill Holman, executive director of the North Carolina Clean Water Management Trust Fund, feels this was one instance where policymakers and scientists were at odds. He cites two examples of proactive, progressive management of water quality in the state's rapidly growing and highly urbanized Piedmont region--the Mountain Island Lake initiative and the Catawba River Mountain Island Lake. The latter contains the largest drinking water supply in North Carolina.
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Record #:
8180
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Standards for treating drinking water and wastewater in the country are becoming stricter. At the same time the pipes and related conduits that bring drinking water to and take wastewater away from the home or business are wearing out. Some of these underground systems have been doing their jobs for over one hundred years. Burgess discusses the problems created in dealing with water infrastructure replacement when federal mandates, like the Clean Water Act, are either underfunded, unfunded, or cut by Congress.
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Record #:
8183
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Since 1988, owners of commercial and noncommercial underground storage tanks (USTs) have had assistance from state trust funds to clean up petroleum leaks. Because of a major backlog of claims and substantial financial deficits, the state is phasing out this assistance program. The North Carolina Department of Waste Management is developing new legislation on USTs. The three objectives of the legislation are: initiate regulatory reform; allocate more money to meet its existing obligations to pay for cleanup at sites already reported; and transition toward alternate means for commercial tank owners to demonstrate, as required by federal law, that they have the financial means through insurance or other sources, to clean up any releases.
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Record #:
8182
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Low-impact development, or LID, is a new stormwater management strategy. Instead of diverting runoff away from its origin, LID assimilates rainwater where it falls, through a system of small, discrete methods distributed throughout the landscape. It uses the hydrological functions that were there before the property was developed. Instead of using traditional methods of water conveyance, like roof downspouts, curbs and gutters, or drainage pipes, builders can use bioretention areas (rain gardens), grassy swales, vegetated buffer/filter strips and infiltration trenches.
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Record #:
34354
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In North Carolina, where sanitary sewers are separate from sewers that carry stormwater, wastewater treatment capacity has not been a priority issue because only extreme rainfall events might threaten treatment capacity. A proposed Environmental Protection Agency policy would allow wastewater blending of primary and secondary treatments as long as permit limits are met. North Carolina does not currently have a blending policy, but may consider a policy that would recognize varying circumstances statewide.