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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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99 results for "Washington the Magazine"
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Record #:
24770
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The Aurora Fossil Museum, located in Aurora, North Carolina, was founded in 1976 and was the first fossil museum in the region. The museum displays the fossils uncovered in phosphate deposits in the area. In 2016, the museum celebrates its fortieth anniversary and its rich history in educational outreach and promoting geology.
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21997
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Rumley recounts how an award-winning construction company, Washington Iron and Metal Company, now known as WIMCO, and a Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper, the Washington Daily News, worked together to renovate the 100-year-old building where the paper is located.
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21977
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Tom Garcia, a seventeen-year veteran of the US Air Force, discusses why he and his wife Nancy have taken up beekeeping in Washington. Most of them \"revolve around sustainability and environmental protection of the bees.\" Almost a third of American crops depend on pollination and that crop value is estimated at $15 billion. Garcia is the founder of the Beaufort County Beekeepers Association.
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Record #:
19583
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Washington artisan Chip Shackleford continues to practice the art of glassblowing, a time honored tradition that is over two thousand years old. Shackleford considers conservation a key aspect of his art as over 90 percent of the materials he uses are recycled. Now he is attempting to get involved in the production of restoration glass for use in historic homes.
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Record #:
23079
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Veteran Captain Richard Andrews appeals to tourists and locals with his description of summer fishing on the Pamlico. After explaining the importance of tourist fishing for the coastal economy, he provides a detailed account of the fish species that enter the Pamlico Sound and Pamlico River during the summer.
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Record #:
37381
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A self-described “treasure hunter” has a collection that has made Washington a site for discovering and rediscovering treasure and treasured possessions. Pictures of his unburied treasure included a Spanish silver real coin from the 18th century and an epaulette from the 19th century. Proving treasure doesn’t have to be relic aged was a class ring, belonging to a soldier deployed in Iraq, who recovered his ring as a result of local Junius Swain’s discovery.
Record #:
21957
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\"They've been called blue grass and newgrass. Some have tried to pigeonhole its sound as country, Americana, indie roots rock.\" However, the music Carolina Still plays defies genre, and the best anyone can come up with is \"old-time moonshiner stomp.\" The band performs about 200 shows a year from Eastern Carolina (their home base) to Memphis and New York. Rumley talks with band members about their style and music over the past eight years.
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Washington the Magazine (NoCar F264.W3 W37), Vol. 1 Issue 4, May/June 2012, p27-29,31, 33, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21984
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To some it's just a pile of wood waiting for the match, but to Lee Cooper Jr., owner of Rustic River Furnishings, it's a pile of driftwood waiting to be fashioned into functional pieces. He was a realtor specializing in waterfront second-homes for clients, and he spent twenty years as a boat builder. He discusses how he got into furniture-making using this unusual product.
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Record #:
19582
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Wine has long been lauded for its medicinal used throughout recorded history. In 1991, 60 minutes aired a broadcast in which it discussed the dietary and health benefits of wine. Health care professionals agree that moderation is the key to benefiting from the consumption of wine.
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Record #:
37358
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Historic Hope Foundation’s open house opens a door into the past of this house in Windsor. Also opening the door to Bertie’s County Colonial past is King-Bazemore House, moved on site from a few miles away. Described by the author as self-contained, Hope Plantation functioned through its own water powered grist mill, saw mill, blacksmith shop, blacksmith’s and cooper’s shops, and buildings for weaving and spinning. King-Bazemore’s “hall and parlor” design was common in dwellings from this era and its furnishings design is based on William King’s 1778 inventory.
Record #:
36168
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Returning to her birthplace entailed coming back to a place that still felt like home. Helping to make it her hometown was familiar haunts like the long standing Bill’s Hot Dogs.
Record #:
19553
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Winter gardening can be a satisfying and rewarding activity to get the avid gardener through the winters of North Carolina. A variety of winter flowers can provide a splash of color throughout the winter months and winter vegetables can be both decorative and delicious.
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Record #:
21983
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Diane Lee was raised on the river and used to crab with her father. When she took up pottery, it seemed natural to include crabs. Although some potters paint their designs on pots, Lee says she never mastered painting. She creates the crabs in 3-D, and they appear on dishes, pots, lampshades, and other functional items.
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Record #:
39525
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An historical home in Washington has become a haven for female veterans recovering from military sexual trauma. Described is a brief history of the Rose Haven House, the house’s original owner, and services that the house’s residents receive as part of their recovery.