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211 results for "The Researcher"
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Record #:
34702
Author(s):
Abstract:
During prohibition in the 1920s, the American schooner VINCENT ran aground on Cape Lookout. Residents from Cape Lookout caught sight of the vessel and went out to see the wreck firsthand. They discovered vinegar bottles filled with scotch whiskey on shore and began collecting the cargo. The fisherman proceeded to recover and sell the whiskey casks.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 20 Issue 1, Spring 2004, p15-17, il
Record #:
34598
Abstract:
While a Methodist chapel pre-dated the establishment of Morehead City, it was razed during the Civil War. The first Methodist Episcopal Church was built in 1884 to replace the chapel. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries, the congregation grew and required further infrastructure including a meeting room, kitchen, and classrooms. In 1960, the educational building was again expanded with the addition of a new wing. The congregation celebrated its 200th anniversary in January 1998 and continues to thrive in Morehead City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Summer 1999, p10-12, il
Record #:
34561
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Gordon C. Willis Co. fish house was located on the banks of Bogue Sound during Thomas Brinson’s childhood. A buyer of seafood (including shad and crabs) from the Menhaden fisheries, Gordon sold fish to local residents and fish factories in Morehead and Beaufort. Gordon’s was also an ice manufacturing plant.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 1, Winter 1995, p12-14
Record #:
34786
Author(s):
Abstract:
A painting of a schooner by artist D.G. Bell was discovered in a Florida garage, dated to 1934. Interested in the work’s history, the owner began chasing leads on the art’s origins by contacting Carteret County citizens whose names were listed on the backside of the painting. One of the names, Tibbie Roberts, yielded answers. Ms. Roberts confirmed that the painting had been given to a local couple as a going-away gift in 1937. D.G. Bell owned a gift shop in Morehead City where he exhibited and sold some of his work. Today, several of his paintings are held in collections at the Carteret County Historical Society. Following the discovery of his work, it was decided that a party would be held to unveil the “long lost” painting and showcase Bell’s talent.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall-Spring 2009-2010, p9-10, il, por
Record #:
34486
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents a general historic overview of Hog Island, 1585-1711. Laughton discusses the island’s 16th century inhabitants, the Neusiok, and associated archaeological sites and historic records. While several historic shell mounds have been destroyed, other archaeological evidence continues to offer insight into the past. The historic record, on the other hand, details very little about Neusiok lifeways or political structure.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Fall 1992, p16-21, il, por, map
Record #:
34529
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clinton E. Lincoln was a resident of Morehead City in between 1854 and 1918. Lincoln patented two inventions during his residency—a sewing table and associated spool holder. The table is exemplary of innovative trends in 19th century daily life, as it would have improved household clothing manufacture. A copy of the patent letter is included in the article.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 3, Summer 1994, p3-5, il
Record #:
34791
Author(s):
Abstract:
In April 1921, the schooner JAMES E. NEWSOM struck Bluefish Lump Shoal and grounded near Cape Lookout, North Carolina. The sailing master and crew abandoned the vessel and began rowing towards the Cape Lookout Lighthouse. Meanwhile, several of the Coast Guardsmen noticed the vessel aground and went out to investigate. Finding NEWSOM empty, they returned to the station where they met the crew. The following day, the station lookout sighted a sail on the horizon. As the vessel grew nearer, the Guardsman recognized the NEWSOM which had gracefully ungrounded and drifted into shore. The crew soon boarded and found NEWSOM in good working condition.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p9-11
Record #:
34763
Abstract:
The Stella, North Carolina, post office was first operated by German immigrant William Kuhn. Kuhn came to North Carolina to work as a book keeper for a local mill operation. Purchasing land near Stella, he opened a general store which doubled as the local post office. Another Carteret County post office, located in Mill Creek, was staffed by members of the local Quaker community during the mid-19th century.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2008, p14-15, il
Record #:
34729
Author(s):
Abstract:
In July, 1917, construction was completed on the breakwater at Cape Lookout. Measuring over two miles in length, the breakwater was built to create safe anchorage for vessels. The breakwater itself is approximately 50 feet in height and constructed from North Carolina granite. Nearby facilities include a Coast Guard Station. While the breakwater was being built, there were numerous other additions to local infrastructure including a new school house, an increase in farms and farm acreage, and creation of new Menhaden fish factories.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
34473
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article is a segment of an oral history with Alton Taylor, who recalls taking agricultural produce to Virginia in his father’s sharpie. Vessel dimensions are given, along with details of the trip.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Spring 1992, p8
Record #:
34685
Abstract:
Asa B. Buck was a local Carteret County boatbuilder who worked from the 1920s through 1969. A North Carolina native, Buck began his career at the Bell Wallace shipyard in Morehead City. He also constructed and repaired small vessels for neighbors and personal use. Relying on homemade plans, Buck would sketch out each timber on the floor of his workshop and cut the associated lumber, usually Cedar, to form.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Spring 2003, p7-10, il, por
Record #:
34501
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article details the life of Alice Green Hoffman, an activist in the women’s suffrage movement, in the Outer Banks. Hoffman was born in New York City but moved to Carteret County in 1918. She sought to protect wildlife on her property ‘Isle of Pines’ in Bogue Banks and, following her death, the land was left to Eleanor Roosevelt, daughter-in-law of President Teddy Roosevelt. In 1956, Roosevelt’s heirs developed the land into Pine Knoll Shores.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 4, Fall 1993, p10-11, il
Record #:
4511
Author(s):
Abstract:
Appleton Oaksmith's life was one adventure after another - sea captain, suspected slaver, Civil War blockade runner, law fugitive, agent for foreign countries, and North Carolina state legislator. He settled in Carteret County in 1873 and was active in county business and political affairs.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 14 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1998, p20-29, il, por, f
Record #:
34589
Abstract:
Brinson recalls her first visit to Lion Tamer’s Camp in Salter Path, ca. 1934. As Salter Path had no tourist infrastructure, the family used a small vernacular craft to travel over to the banks. Other residents did have cars and could access Morehead City at low tide. The village of Salter Path itself consisted of a few properties with small, one story clapboard houses, and their gardens. The village post office, situated in the front room of a local resident, was a local meeting place.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 11 Issue 4, Fall 1995, p11-12
Record #:
34534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asa Gaskins was a resident of Carteret County in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Gaskins held a variety of jobs, including carpenter, fisheries worker, foreman, and school board member. Throughout these various careers, Gaskins continued to build houses for family and neighbors and aided in constructing the first Camp Glenn School in 1913 for children living in Camp Glenn. Gaskins’ children attended the school. Following the death of Asa Gaskins, the property remained in the family until the 1980s. Today, the school is the home of the Carteret County Historical Society.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 4, Fall 1994, p7-10, il, por, f