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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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398 results for "The Laurel of Asheville "
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Record #:
29806
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For nearly twenty years, a massive effort has been underway to inventory all of the organisms that live in the Great Smoky Mountains. The All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory is the largest sustained natural history inventory in the United States, and has led to the discovery of thousands of new species.
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24113
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Lake Eden Arts Festival celebrates its 35th year in operation with workshops, performances, exhibitions, and dancing.
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24038
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The author presents arguments for why the Blue Ridge Parkway, a 469-mile road between North Carolina and Virginia, provides for a strong community. The Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation has funded over 3.7 million in programs and projects centered on the Parkway.
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36557
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Embodying the important of mind-body balance is a practice that encourages a holistic approach to health. Body-Mind Centering considers how the functioning of bodily organs, tissues, and glands can impact a person’s emotional well-being. Offering more information about a practice that integrates principles of Chinese medicine is the clinic director of Asheville’s Daoist Acupuncture College and owner of a local Pilates, yoga, and wellness studio.
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29837
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The Bradford Watermelon is an heirloom with a classic narrative of glory, loss and revival, and prominent example of a story of North Carolina food culture over the last century. The watermelon variety was created through the exchange and crossing of seeds in the early 1800s. Asheville’s Sow True Seed is now the sole distributor of the Bradford Watermelon seeds.
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29915
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Slow Food Asheville picked the Cherokee Purple heirloom tomato to spotlight for its 2017 Heritage Food Project. In 1990, Craig LeHoullier of Raleigh, North Carolina, obtained and grew a packet of unnamed seeds that had been shared by the Cherokee Indians more than one-hundred years before. The tomato is purple in color and has gained a widespread fame amongst heirloom tomatoes.
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Record #:
29802
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Warblers are often considered the gems of North American bird life and over forty species pass through Western North Carolina during the year. As these songbirds begin migration in April, there are many opportunities to observe and learn about warblers around Asheville. Regular events and walks are held by the Audubon Society, Ventures Birding Tours and other local birders.
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Record #:
24003
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Asheville's Buncombe Turnpike connected thousands of drovers from Tennessee and North Carolina to South Carolina's railroads. The turnpike provided French Broad River residents with a way to get their herds across the river. Eventually, the West Asheville Bridge was constructed in 1911 to the flood of traffic across the French Broad River.
Record #:
36483
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For European explorers, natural historians, and botanists traversing the territory now known as North America, nature walks had at least two purposes. They were commissioned to find herbs to take back to the Old World and become familiar with the land their host countries intended to colonize. Naturalist William Bartram’s journey covered the Appalachian Mountains to Florida, as well as throughout the southeast to the Mississippi River. His chronicles, published collectively as Bartram’s Travels, may serve as an apt guide for those following the trail memorializing his journey. Within are a wealth of specimens, drawings, and observations about the people and landscape he encountered between 1773-1777.
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29855
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Pamela Zimmerman continues her family tradition of growing berries by running Zimmerman’s Berry Farm in Marshall, North Carolina. Zimmerman likes to be transparent about the growing process and aims to connect people to their food, farms and agricultural heritage. Each summer, Zimmerman’s Berry Farm participates in the Farm Tour organized by Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project.
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Record #:
24041
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Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project seeks to help children connect with their food through two initiatives: Growing Minds Farm to School and Growing Minds at Market. ASAP seeks to get children involved in the growing and cooking process of food in order to foster healthy eating habits from a young age.
Record #:
24082
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Eblen Charities is a non-profit organization has followed its mission, 'help people stop hurting', for twenty-two years. Ove the years, Eblen has assisted tens of thousands of families through a number of programs and events, including dental programs, housing assistance, and health assistance.
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36585
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The movement encouraging a deeper connection to and respect for nature has generated the combination of agriculture and neighborhoods. The profile agrihood, Olivette, facilitates eco-sensitive practices such as permaculture to protect existing species and promote responsible stewardship of the land.
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29756
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Asheville Farm To Table Tours is a new form of agritourism operated by Ann D. Strauss. The tour takes visitors to various farms where they learn about farm life and mountain foodways. Some of the destinations include East Fork Farm, Spinning Spider Creamery, and The Farmer’s Hands.
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Record #:
24114
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Less than a hundred years ago, Asheville was filled with American chestnut trees. Today, few trees remain. One organization, the American Chestnut Foundation, seeks to change that by working to develop a tree that can survive blight and thrive in the area.