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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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589 results for "Tar Heel Junior Historian"
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Record #:
28914
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During World War I, North Carolinians were affected in many ways. Men, women, and children stepped up to help out the cause in a variety of ways. Many joined the war effort as soldiers, bases were created in Fayetteville, Raleigh, Charlotte, and Hillsborough, people bought war bonds, children were encouraged to help garden, women joined organizations like the Red Cross, and North Carolina’s wartime industry brought jobs and money to the state.
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Record #:
28913
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Kiffin Yates Rockwell (1892-1916) was a North Carolinian who volunteered to help fight for the Allies during World War I before the United States entered the war. Rockwell flew for France in an air squadron known as the Lafayette Escadrille as part of the French Foreign Legion. Rockwell’s personal history before the war and his death during the war are detailed.
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Record #:
28916
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The impact the Women’s Land Army of America had on the war effort during World War I is detailed. The idea for the group originally started in Great Britain before being adopted in America. The group encouraged women known as “farmerettes” to volunteer by helping plant, grow, or harvest crops during the war. This group helped the Suffrage Movement and the history of the group before, during, and after the war is detailed.
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Record #:
28959
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During World War I, more than 2,300 German citizens were housed in camp in Hot Springs, NC by the US Government. The government feared the Germans might be spies and interned them in the mountains. The Germans were not soldiers and lived in harmony with the local people. The history of the situation is briefly described.
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Record #:
28958
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Women who served in the Army Nurse Corps during World War I at Base Hospital 65 in Brest, France share their stories. 90 of the 100 nurses stationed at the hospital were from North Carolina. Over the course of 14 months, the nurses treated nearly 40,000 soldiers. The history of the nurses of Base Hospital 65 is detailed.
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Record #:
28988
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More than 20,000 black North Carolinians were called to fight for “democracy” in World War I while being denied equal rights back home. The soldiers faced discrimination at home and in the military. Stories of their service and how they were treated within the Army, by the British soldiers, and by the French soldiers are told.
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Record #:
28989
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North Carolina State University’s Memorial Belltower was built to honor alumni who were killed in battle in World War I. The tower was designed by William Henry Deacy and construction began November 10, 1921. Currently, the belltower is often used as a gathering place for celebrations. The history of the memorial since WWI is detailed.
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Record #:
25106
Abstract:
In 1830, President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act into law, allowing the government to force many American Indians to leave their home lands. Some Cherokee tribes remained in North Carolina and became known as the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation. Today, they run schools in Cherokee, North Carolina and preserve their culture through the buildings, education, and community on campus.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
25109
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Abstract:
American Sign Language (ASL) has many dialects throughout the United States and in North Carolina. Some dialects in North Carolina have local signs that are different, while others are unique to certain ethnicities. This article specifically looks at the evolution of Black ASL in North Carolina.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p24-26, il, por
Record #:
25108
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Abstract:
Linguist Paul Reed describes the history of North Carolina’s Appalachian dialect, saying that it is a combination of American Indian languages and the languages of other immigrant groups blended together. Geography has also contributed to the conservation of the dialect over the years.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p12-13, il, por
Record #:
25107
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Citizens of the villages on the barrier islands of North Carolina have spoken a distinctive English dialect not found outside of the Outer Banks. Dr. Walt Wolfram, a professor at NC State and researcher of North Carolina dialects, describes the Outer Banks brogue and highlights the importance of documenting it for future generations.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 55 Issue 2, Spring 2016, p10-11, il, por, map
Record #:
36650
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Abstract:
The author talks about the different New Year’s celebrations held in North Carolina’s past. The Cherokee’s ‘Great New Moon Ceremony,’ colonial Christmas, Watch Night, Hogmanay, Rosh Hashanah, and numerous other celebrations that still bring people together for New Year’s festivities.
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Record #:
36649
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The author gives the history of the early beginnings of North Carolina Christmas flotilla’s and the Ocean Isle Beach Christmas Flotilla and what it takes to build a display for a boat in the flotilla.
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Record #:
36646
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Abstract:
The author talks about her helping young Karen immigrants from Burma (Myanmar) who worked at Transplanting Traditions Farm. By creating a children’s book, they could tell their story of their culture, their transition from Burma to America, and learning to transplant their farming traditions in North Carolina. Using her writing skills and the art of nine members of the Karen Youth Art Group, the book entitled ‘Transplanting Traditions: The Story of a Community Farm” was published in June 2016.
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Record #:
36638
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Abstract:
The author explains that though the Day of the Dead is celebrated the same time as Halloween, they are very different. The Day of the Dead is a time to remember family and friends who have died. She tells of how the American tradition of Halloween has blended with the Central American traditions to create a huge party.
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