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589 results for "Tar Heel Junior Historian"
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Record #:
36503
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the former practice where white people in towns got to vote for members of their city school system and also got to vote for the members of the county school system. That vote diluted the vote from the county citizens; which led to white men from towns running the county schools.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1, , p13-14, il
Record #:
14363
Abstract:
Meekins describes the problems faced by women, children, older citizens, and others who maintained the home front during the Civil War. They dealt with situations like shortages of sugar, coffee, and flour; difficulties in planting and harvesting crops; and high prices caused by speculators.
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Record #:
13508
Abstract:
Margaret Anna Robertson was born in 1810, and in 1831, she married the Rev. Robert Burwell. In 1835, the family moved to Hillsborough, where Rev. Burwell had accepted the pastorate of the Presbyterian Church. There, she was prompted by local townspeople to open a school. In 1837, the Burwell School opened, initially for local girls. Burwell's curriculum for girls was progressive for the times and offered courses such as penmanship, geography, astronomy, algebra, chemistry, and philosophy. In 1857, the Burwells moved to Charlotte, where Rev. Burwell became president of the Charlotte Female Institute, now Queens University of Charlotte.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p31-34, il, por
Record #:
2590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many ordinary people led civil rights protests. In 1968-69, when school desegregation in Hyde County threatened the loss of two Afro-American schools, a one-year student boycott saved the schools.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 35 Issue 1, Fall 1995, p32-35, il
Record #:
36423
Author(s):
Abstract:
Barbara B. Snowden, the 1984 Advisor of the year, presented the award to Peggy W. Lowe, of Riverview Elementary School, Murfreesboro, NC.
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Record #:
36345
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author writes about Phillis Wheatley, first Negro writer of significance in America. She was born in Africa about 1753, was brought into America in 1761. As a slave of the John Wheatley family of Boston, she learned English and could read difficult writings within 16 months of her arrival. Her first poem was published in 1770 and in 1775 she wrote a poem honoring George Washington. In this poem she referred to the United States as ‘Columbia;’ the first use of that word with that meaning attached.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 16 Issue No. 3, , p28, por
Record #:
13481
Abstract:
In 1839, Thomas Day, the master cabinetmaker from Milton in Caswell County, acquired ten-year-old Archibald Clark as an apprentice. State law required that all orphans and children of unmarried parents be bound to a master or mistress through indenture to the age of twenty-one. Marshall describes what Archibald's life would have been like during his indenture period.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Fall 2010, p20-23, il
Record #:
36415
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author tells the story of a ghost of a little girl in a flower garden. She was seen at a certain spot picking and smelling flowers. Later it was discovered proof of a murder and the spot where the little girl was seen in the garden was dug up and the skeleton of a small child was found.
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Record #:
16079
Abstract:
In 1788, the North Carolina Constitutional Convention deemed it necessary to develop a fixed seat of government in the colony. By 1791, New Bern, in Craven County, was deemed a worthy site and a General Assembly meeting proposed a 400 acre expanse and planned the city details including: placement of the state house, plot size, street widths, and areas for public use.
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Record #:
7678
Author(s):
Abstract:
Joel Queen is an eighth-generation potter. Queen, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee, has always been interested in arts and crafts, but has worked as an artist full-time only for the past four years. In 2005, he opened his own gallery near Cherokee to show and sell his work. Queen's creations have been displayed at the Smithsonian Institution, the British Museum in London, and at Monticello.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Fall 2005, p25-27, il, por
Record #:
7348
Author(s):
Abstract:
Koonts discusses the interesting connection between Arthur Dobbs, the royal governor of North Carolina; James Glasgow, the first North Carolina secretary of state; and General Nathaniel Greene, the Revolutionary War hero. Present-day Greene County at one time bore the name of each man. Koonts discusses how the name changes occurred.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p14-17, il, por, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
14385
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1862, Union troops under General Ambrose Burnside occupied New Bern and a large portion of Eastern North Carolina. Escaping slaves found a safe haven behind their lines and soon became a source of wartime labor and even military service for the Union. A number formed a community of churches, schools, and homes on Roanoke Island which soon grew to 3,500 men, women, and children by 1864. Lanier interviewed Virginia Simmons Tillet, one of the colony's descendants, about this little-known Civil War story.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Spring 2011, p37-39, il, por
Record #:
7349
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mewborn discusses the role Dr. Cartwright played in forming the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association in 1953. Dr. Cartwright was a professor at Duke University from 1951 to 1980. Previously he had served as the historian for the Military District of Washington during World War II and taught history and education at Boston University. He had been involved with a junior historian program in Minnesota.
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Record #:
7957
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state adopted its first slave code in 1715. This document defined the social, economic, and physical places of enslaved people. Most of the slaves purchased in the colony came from Virginia and South Carolina, and most lived on large plantations in the eastern section. The largest plantation was Stagville, established in 1787, and located in parts of what is now Orange and three other counties. More than 900 slaves worked on the 30,000-acre plantation.
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