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52 results for "Southern Indian Studies"
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Record #:
18661
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Archaeological investigations of prehistoric rhyolite quarries in the Uwharrie Mountains of North Carolina have developed systematic databases of rhyolite variability allowing others to source stone tool assemblages from North Carolina and surrounding areas.
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Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 45 Issue , Oct 1996, p1-37, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18662
Abstract:
During the summer and winter of 1992, researchers identified a rare chert quarry site and a lithic workshop in the Piedmont of North Carolina that challenges common associations about prehistoric trade and exchange.
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Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 45 Issue , Oct 1996, p38-56, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18663
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The Broad Reach Site is a Middle to Late Woodland burial and habitation site in Carteret County revealed numerous burial features including ossuaries, and single and double interments.
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Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 44 Issue , Oct 1995, p37-69, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18665
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Radiocarbon dates relevant to North Carolina prehistory have been compiled to allow for analysis of archaeological materials through temporal and geographic distributions.
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Record #:
18664
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The North Carolina Radiocarbon Date Study was undertaken to compile information about radiocarbon dates that have been obtained from archaeological contexts in North Carolina.
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Record #:
18666
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Hammett uses historical and archaeological reconstructions of the environment to aid in understanding how human groups in the southeastern United States, including North Carolina, used their landscape from aboriginal inhabitants to European contact.
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Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 41 Issue , Oct 1992, p1-50, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18667
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There is still uncertainty about many of the tribal origins of many of the Native American groups in North Carolina. However, recent archaeological work near the Occaneechi village on the banks of the Eno River near Hillsborough exposed the community as descendants of the Saponi and Occaneechi, thought to have been completely gone years ago.
Source:
Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 40 Issue , Oct 1991, p1-29, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18669
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Davis provides a reprint of the account of James Needham and Gabriel Arthur's journeys in 1673 and 1674 through the piedmont and mountains of North Carolina to establish trading contracts with the Cherokee. They were first published in THE FIRST EXPLORATIONS OF THE TRANS-ALLEGHENY REGION BY THE VIRGINIANS, 1650-1674 by Alvord and Bidgood in 1912.
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Record #:
18668
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Many a road or community in North Carolina has the namesake of the buffalo, and locals will tell you that this creature once thrived in the state. Ward reviews the historical and archaeological evidence for the existence of buffalo in North Carolina.
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Record #:
18671
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May discusses excavations at the Crowders Creek site in Gaston County. With the help of local groups that included interested individuals, the discovery of human burials and other features have warranted additional excavations and interpretation of cultural artifacts.
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Record #:
18670
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Archaeological investigations at sites such as Payne and Town Creek explore remains of the Pee Dee culture, which brought a new mode of life to the North Carolina mountains that included larger villages, agriculture, and specific ceremonies.
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Record #:
18672
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Rights examines the route of the first explorers who ventured into central North Carolina in hopes of trade with the Native Americans.
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Record #:
18673
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This volume discusses archaeological investigations surrounding the historic Occaneechi settlement visited by John Lawson in 1701, near Hillsborough. Researches examine pottery, historic artifacts, faunal remains, plant remains, burials, and structures.
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Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 36-37 Issue , Oct 1988, p1-128, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18679
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Daniel examines the sample of unifacial stone tools discovered at the Hardaway site in Stanly County as a unique assemblage with its own typology.
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Record #:
18680
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McManus discusses the analysis of a lithic assemblage from the Forbush Creek site in Yadkin County. Stone tools and associated debitage were examines to provide information concerning the technology and subsistence-related activities of Late Prehistoric Indians in the piedmont of North Carolina.
Source:
Southern Indian Studies (NoCar E 78.S55 S6), Vol. 34 Issue , Oct 1985, p3-48, il, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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