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1051 results for "North Carolina"
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Record #:
8472
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Abstract:
At the 2006 Great American Brew Festival, held in Denver, Colorado, North Carolina brewers returned with five medals. The festival is the most prestigious beer competition in the country. Over 450 breweries from the United States entered 2,400 beers in 69 categories. Judges came from nine countries. In 2006, state breweries won their first gold medals. Ham's Restaurant and Brewhouse in Greenville won a gold medal for its Sunfest Lager, and Duck-Rabbit Craft Brewery in Farmville received a bronze medal.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p8, il
Record #:
8473
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The Old Salem Toy Museum in Winston-Salem was founded in 2002 by Tom Gray and his mother, Anne Gray. The museum is housed in the Frank L. Horton Museum Center, and the thousands of toys in the collection span a period of 1,700 years. One of the rare items in the museum is a paint set George Washington gave his step-granddaughter in 1793 for her fourteenth birthday. Gray had to outbid the staff at Mount Vernon for the toy.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p9, por
Record #:
8482
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Sampson County and its industries are open to the world because of their proximity to the state seaports at Morehead City and Wilmington and the county's location along Interstates 40 and 95. Sampson County's industries include the Schindler Escalator Corp., which is the largest producer of escalators in the nation; the Garland Shirt Factory, which makes Brooks Brothers shirts; and Kivett's Inc., an outfitter of churches, from pews to spires to stained glass windows. The county has 1,200 family-owned and corporate farms. With annual cash receipts of over $538 million, the county has the state's largest farming economy and ranks among North Carolina's top five producers in turkey, pork, sweet potatoes, and corn.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p23-24, 26-28, 30, 34, 36-38, 40-42, il
Record #:
8485
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Chinqua-Penn Plantation, closed since 2002 due to lack of funding, was reopened in 2006 by its new owners, Calvin and Lisa Phelps. Phelps, CEO of three companies, purchased the building and the twenty-five surrounding acres from N.C. State University for $4.1 million. The twenty-seven-room mansion, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was built in the 1920s by Betsy and Thomas Jefferson Penn and is a blend of gardens, architecture, and works of art. The Phelps plan to use Chinqua-Penn in a variety of ways, including group tours, weddings, corporate retreats, meetings, and photography opportunities.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p57, il
Record #:
8483
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Wright describes the Sanderling Resort, Spa and Conference Center. Located on the Outer Banks, the center is one of the most popular getaways in the world for conferences and for vacations. It boasts an extensive art collection of bird statuary, Audubon prints, and original artwork. Grainger McKoy and Dorothy Doughty are two featured artists. The resort was voted among the top twenty-five in the country by readers of CONDE NAST TRAVELER magazine.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p52-53, il
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Record #:
8484
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Abstract:
William L. Roper, CEO of UNC Health System, is featured in NORTH CAROLINA magazine's executive profile. Roper was named to his current position in March 2004, after serving for seven years as dean of the University of North Carolina School of Public Health.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 1, Jan 2007, p54-56, il, por
Record #:
8558
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Abstract:
North Carolina refused to ratify the new Constitution in 1788, unless a list of rights for all citizens was added to it. To win over North Carolina and other states, James Madison sent twelve handwritten copies of the rights to the states; they were accepted. Today this list is known as the Bill of Rights. After the Civil War, the state's handwritten copy was stolen by a Union soldier and carried to Ohio. The document remained lost until the FBI recovered it in Philadelphia 2003. It is now back in North Carolina. In 2007, the document will be exhibited at several sites around the state. Each stop will include special programs highlighting different amendments.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p11, il
Record #:
8557
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The Mecklenburg County commissioners approved a land swap that gives the local minor league baseball team land in booming downtown Charlotte. Don Beaver, the owner of the Charlotte Knights, a Triple-A affiliate of the Chicago White Sox, plans to build a 10,000-seat ballpark using private funds. Beaver is a successful minor league baseball entrepreneur and has interests in several ball teams. His Hickory Crawdads regularly set attendance records in the South Atlantic League. He has experience in building stadiums for his teams in Sevierville, TN, and in New Orleans, LA. The Charlotte stadium will open in 2009.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p6, il
Record #:
8569
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Durham is a city of many facets. It is the site of the Research Triangle Park, the Duke Medical Center, and 50 percent of the state's biotechnology companies. It is a city that does not like to tear down its history. Buildings that once housed tobacco and textiles represent some of the city's finest architecture. They are now used as offices, shops, restaurants, living spaces, and studios for artists. Wright discusses things to do while visiting Durham, including exploring Civil War history, tobacco history, and African-American history; the arts, such as the American Dance Festival and the Carolina Theatre; and the environment at Eno State Park.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 2, Feb 2007, p40-41, il
Record #:
8725
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Abstract:
Visitors have been coming to Chimney Rock in Rutherford County since 1883. Lucius Morse and his brothers purchased it in 1902, for $5,000 and planned to develop it as a tourist attraction. The park has belonged to Morse family ever since. Over the years millions of people have visited the rock and made the climb to the top to enjoy the spectacular view. Recently there were fears that the Morse family would sell the 1,000-acre property, which was valued at $55 million, on the open market. However, in January 2007, Gov. Michael Easley announced that the state had purchased the property, and it will be added to the state park system.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 3, Mar 2007, p32-33, il
Record #:
8724
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The great flood following Hurricane Floyd in 1999 devastated portions of Rocky Mount. A number of attractions, including the visual arts center and the children's museum, were destroyed. Wright discusses how civic leaders responded by spending $50 million from the public sector to enhance the city's quality of life and public facilities. For example, using the abandoned Imperial tobacco factory, Rocky Mount replaced the lost cultural attractions. In the downtown area, the city is in the midst of a revival, with a refurbished 1903 train station and renovations of historic properties.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 3, Mar 2007, p30-31, il
Record #:
8722
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Golf is more than a game in North Carolina--it is a lifestyle. North Carolinians don't just want to drive to the golf course; they want to live next to it and enjoy all the amenities, such as full-service clubhouses, Olympic size pools, fitness centers, tennis courts, and more. Golfers are one of the highest-income purchasing groups in the housing market, and home prices and golf are definitely linked. A golf course sets the tone for the community and becomes the centerpiece. Depending on location, homes in golfing communities can run from $300,000 into the millions.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 3, Mar 2007, p18-19, il
Record #:
8720
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Abstract:
Golfing is big business in the state. The North Carolina Division of Tourism, Film, and Sports Development has actively promoted golfing to travelers from England and Canada for years. In 2007, golfing promotions are taking place in Germany. The promotions go beyond just a trip to the tees and highlight the state's distinctive lodgings, food and wine, arts, shopping, and historic attractions. Wright highlights promotional activities to attract golfers.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 3, Mar 2007, p7-8, il
Record #:
8723
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John Atkins III, incoming chairman of the North Carolina Citizens for Business and Industry (NCCBI) board, is profiled. Atkins is co-founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of O'Brien/Atkins Associates, one of the Research Triangle Metropolitan Area's largest architectural and engineering firms. Among his priorities are creating the best business climate in the nation and a world-class education system that produces a highly skilled, well-prepared workforce.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 3, Mar 2007, p22-24, il
Record #:
8721
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The spa trend is sweeping the state's golf courses, as men and women golfers seek relaxation after a strenuous play of eighteen holes. Wright highlights several of them and what they have to offer, including The Spa at Pinehurst, the Grove Park Inn and Resort and Spa at Asheville, and the Grandover in Greensboro.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 3, Mar 2007, p10-12, il
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