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58 results for "North Carolina Archaeology"
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Record #:
18629
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Abstract:
Fish remains recovered from prehistoric archaeological sites along the Roanoke River in Virginia and North Carolina have been found to not be native to the Roanoke, as well as a lack of species that should be found in the area. Reconsiderations of previous research will help determine if this discrepancies are unique to the prehistoric fisheries of the Roanoke.
Source:
North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 57 Issue , Oct 2008, p97-107, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
35122
Abstract:
In 2000, excavation teams from East Carolina University returned to this area after a twenty plus year absence. Examined were the area’s early and middle Holocene chronology, typology, and geoarchaeology of the middle to late Archaic periods. Data was gathered through sedimentology, site formations, and mapping and shovel testing of the sand ridge. Recovered were flakes and sherds of ceramics and stone tools. Complementing the qualitative data were figures detailing sherd and site images. Tables contained data related to ceramic types and sample sizes for tool flakes and sherds.
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Record #:
35123
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Abstract:
This project was undertaken to deepen the understanding of Deep Creek ceramics from the early Woodland period, established by archaeological excavations at the Northern Coastal Plain’s Parker and Barber Creeks by David Phelps (1975, 1977, 1983). Methodology employed during this site work involved surface treatment and temper analyses of sherds. A conclusion drawn from analyses was a consistency between wares recovered and ceramic artifacts dating from this period. Data was represented in figures featuring images of the sherds from these sites and tables depicting temper size, abundance, and inclusions.
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Record #:
35121
Abstract:
Between 2001-2007, pottery from the early middle, and late Qualla periods was excavated from Tennessee Valley’s Coweeta Creek in Southwestern NC. Credited by the author as one of the first analytical comparisons of these ceramic styles, this article contains an analysis of cultural artifacts, Cherokee settlements, and lifeways of prehistoric and historic Cherokee groups. Also discussed were the Qualla ceramic series, sherd samples, and temporal differences between sherds. Images of and quantitative data for these sherds can be found in the figures and tables.
Record #:
35124
Abstract:
Discussed were artifacts, initially identified as Morrow Mountain Projectile Points, discovered in a site in Mount Olive, NC. To build his case, the author, proposing that the three butchering tools were actually knives, used this evidence: crafting method; shape, size, weight, and width of the blade; and perceived functions. Illustrations related to these factors were figures featuring images of knives recovered from other archaeological excavations.
Record #:
18628
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through an opportunity afforded by a survey conducted by the North Carolina Department of Transportation, archaeologists some of the most remote and culturally conservative portions of the traditional Cherokee lands in the western part of the State. Through ethnographic and archaeological investigations, researchers now better understand the effect the natural environment had on the cultural characteristics of the Cherokee in this area.
Source:
North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 56 Issue , Oct 2007, p96-117, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
35120
Abstract:
This article contains an analysis of the authors' excavation from sites at the Piedmont region between the Archaic to Woodland periods by Coastal Carolina Research Inc. Their analysis included geoarchaeological methods such as radioactive carbon dating, soil taxonomy, and geological descriptive methods. Include were figures containing statistical measures, excavation site views, and images of artifacts, as well as tables containing strata data.
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Record #:
35417
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
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Record #:
35119
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edmond Boudreaux chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
Record #:
18627
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although the Catawba Nation of Indians is dispersed across the United States and part of Mexico, remnants of their once consolidated culture remain in arenas such pottery, where Catawba potters still produce distinctive pieces.
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Record #:
35118
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The arrow heads, discovered in the 1960s, were discussed fully for the first time. Their fluted points, classified as Clovis or Redstone, were examined in terms of physical appearance and significance as a Paleoindian artifact. Particular significance noted by I. Randolph Daniel are the fluted points’ unrefined typological points; discovery from a single site; and evidence for the raw material not originating in NC. Included are a table with measurements and figure with images.
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Record #:
35117
Abstract:
In 2002-2003, Brent Riggs, R.P. Stephen Davis, and Mark Plane, archaeologists from the University of North Carolina, discovered Catawba pottery from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in New Town, South Carolina. Highlighted aspects of their discovery included this pottery’s characteristics, assemblage, production and trade. Also noted was this research’s significance and implications for the Colonoware debate. Figures feature location sites, shards or vessels images, and burnishing stones that aided in Catawba pottery’s production.
Record #:
8451
Abstract:
On May 29, 1664, colonists arrived in what is now Brunswick County to establish a town. Most of the arrivals were English. They chose a site on a low knoll at the mouth of Town Creek, a large tributary of the Lower Cape Fear River. Considerations in selecting this site would have included navigation, anchorage, defense, and centrality of position within the colony. The settlement was intended to be an agricultural one. By the fall of 1667, the colony was abandoned. Forces far removed from the colony contributed to its decline, including failure to obtain essential patents and charters from the king and lords proprietors, England�s war with Holland, and internal squabbles among the colony�s backers. Loftfield discusses what excavations reveal about the colony.
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Record #:
8450
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McReynolds investigates the distribution of 35,079 Archaic and Woodland projectile points recovered in the state. The distribution of the points by cultural period and region indicates that the Piedmont was more heavily exploited throughout prehistory than the mountains or coastal plain. The distribution also reveals specific preferences for materials in making the points.
Source:
North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 54 Issue , Oct 2005, p1-33, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
35211
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Abstract:
Andrew Madsen's article chronicled the findings of “The Road to Hope” excavation at Hope Plantation in Bertie County, occupied during the nineteenth century by the David Stone family. Undertaken in 2001-2002 by Coastal Carolina Research Inc., this study sought to better comprehend slaves’ retention of African cultural beliefs and practices within the development of a North Carolinian Creolized culture. This goal was met through the examination of Colonoware ceramic fragments, which were also compared to recoveries from Virginia and South Carolina Plantation sites.
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