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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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58 results for "North Carolina Archaeology"
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Record #:
35417
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The author chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
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Record #:
35119
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Edmond Boudreaux chronicled an updated ceramic development of the Town Creek Region, needed in light of the area’s extensive excavation history. Parts of this chronology included a description of the South Appalachian Mississippian Tradition, the six steps of the ceramic analysis for the author’s research, the use of multiple seriation methods, earlier research by Oliver (1992) proposing the groups of pottery fell into three ceramic phases. The excavation’s sites, typology for the pottery, and Ford seriation graphs were featured in figures. Tables contained seriation data and Mississippi period radiocarbon dates. Pottery images were located in Appendix A.
Record #:
4427
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Lowder's Ferry, a prehistoric archaeological site, was discovered in 1948, during grading of a parking lot. The site is located at Marrow Mountain State Park in Stanly County. Using Joffre Coe's unpublished 1949 field notes, Drye reconstructs the site's structure and reevaluates the sequence of the discovered projectile points.
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Record #:
18604
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Between 1999 and 2001, approximately 84,000 faunal specimens from seven excavated sites along the Roanoke River Basin in North Carolina and Virginia were cataloged and analyzed. The purpose of the study was to provide information to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to develop fishery management plans and restoration plans for endangered species through studying this historic distribution and abundance of fish and other animals in the basin.
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Record #:
18625
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In 2001, the UNC Research Laboratories of Archaeology began the Catawba Project, an extension of the 20-year Siouan Project that seeks to trace the evolution of native societies of the Carolina Piedmont through the 18th and early 19th centuries. Documentary and archaeological research have exposed a series of settlements now known to have given rise to the modern Catawba Nation.
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Record #:
35120
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This article contains an analysis of the authors' excavation from sites at the Piedmont region between the Archaic to Woodland periods by Coastal Carolina Research Inc. Their analysis included geoarchaeological methods such as radioactive carbon dating, soil taxonomy, and geological descriptive methods. Include were figures containing statistical measures, excavation site views, and images of artifacts, as well as tables containing strata data.
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Record #:
4426
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In 1958, Brunswick Town was rediscovered and excavations began shortly thereafter. Research at the site between 1958 and 1968 contributed to Brunswick Town's becoming a State Historic Site. The authors summarize the decade's archaeological investigations, their significance, and their importance in the archaeological history of the state.
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Record #:
35203
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Beaman’s intent was the determine whether the normative frequency ranges of the Carolina artifact patterns were sufficient to accommodate the upper class lifestyle of Tryon Palace, the home of Loyalist governors such as Josiah Martin and William Tryon. Factors used to determine this possibility were an examination of the Palace’s artifact groups and individual artifacts. Beaman’s conclusion was that many of these artifact groups deviated from the expected normative ranges. Furniture, Personal, and Tobacco Pipe groups were beyond the range, while the Kitchen and Clothing groups were below the range. Only the Architecture, Arms, and Activities fell within the anticipated normative ranges.
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Record #:
20362
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Among the historical foundations and items of historical interest at the excavations at Brunswick Town, pottery sherds are of particular interest, being a unique style to the region.
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Record #:
35208
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Mark Plane’s study examined the Catawba’s resilience during their contact with English settlers throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. In addition to adopting many cultural practices, this Native American group was able to keep its cultural identity intact. What the author focuses on, though, are the English cultural practices the Catawba adopted, reflected in the changes in their ceramics and eating habits. Underscored was the role that strategic alliances with the British through trade played in these social and cultural adoptions.
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Record #:
35209
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This article examined the warfare strategy Catawba employed to keep their cultural identity intact in the midst of English colonization and contact with these settlers. Described by the author as “ethnic soldiers,” this strategy yielded their place as highly valued military auxiliaries. Highlighted were activities that assured this value: assisting in curbing slave rebellions; fighting with British troops during the Revolutionary, Mexican-American, and Civil Wars.
Record #:
18626
Abstract:
Ethnographic documents suggest that the total population of the Catawba Indians declined from 1700 to 1850 but then increased again over the next one hundred years. Sources reveal that while European-introduced diseases were among determinants of Catawba population change, emigration and other factors may have been significant.
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Record #:
18627
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Although the Catawba Nation of Indians is dispersed across the United States and part of Mexico, remnants of their once consolidated culture remain in arenas such pottery, where Catawba potters still produce distinctive pieces.
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Record #:
35117
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In 2002-2003, Brent Riggs, R.P. Stephen Davis, and Mark Plane, archaeologists from the University of North Carolina, discovered Catawba pottery from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in New Town, South Carolina. Highlighted aspects of their discovery included this pottery’s characteristics, assemblage, production and trade. Also noted was this research’s significance and implications for the Colonoware debate. Figures feature location sites, shards or vessels images, and burnishing stones that aided in Catawba pottery’s production.
Record #:
35201
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John Byrd’s examination of ceramic assemblage from the Davenport site, located in Bertie County along the Pamlico River, proposed possible similarities between those ceramics and three others gathered in Northeastern NC. Temporal patterns in paste temper and surface were used to determine similarities. From his assessment of the Davenport data, which uncovered a ceramic series deposited earlier than expected, Byrd proposed that the cultural-historical framework standard for these ceramic series needed to be refined.
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