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93 results for "NC Arts"
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Record #:
9342
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fayetteville is the first town named for the Marquis de Lafayette, and the town is celebrating the 250th anniversary of his birth with a year-long series of events. Wright discusses some of the town's early history, its heavy involvement with the military, and downtown revitalization.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 65 Issue 6, June 2007, p42-45, il, por
Record #:
28932
Author(s):
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Grants from the North Carolina Arts Council are enabling seven communities to engage in planning for public art and community design projects. Creating Place is a new pilot grants program designed to encourage communities to include elements of art and design in their redevelopment and cultural tourism plans.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p9
Record #:
28933
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The St. Joseph’s Historic Foundation, Inc. has launched the African American Cultural Tourism Website. A project funded by the North Carolina Arts Council, the site offers visitors information about fourteen of the state’s most prominent African American cultural organizations.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p10
Record #:
28931
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In an interview with Jim Ketch of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Music Department, Ketch discussed North Carolina’s place in the jazz world. He talked about the influence of Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane on jazz, and how jazz music is evolving throughout the state.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p4-5, por
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Record #:
28928
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bob Harrell and Beverly Patterson discuss how the land in eastern North Carolina is still crucial to our communities. Harrell aims to reconnect people with their culture or their agri-culture at the Albermarle Learning Center in Chowan County. Patterson leads a program called the Annenburg Rural Challenge to promote rural folk history and culture.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p2-3, por
Record #:
28929
Author(s):
Abstract:
Located in Columbia, Tyrrell County, Pocosin Arts uses the arts to connect culture to the environment. Pocosin Arts has taken on a number of ambitious projects, including 7000 Juniper, An Art Action for the Millennium. This project aims to restore the juniper, an endangered tree of cultural significance, by planting 7,000 junipers in the coastal plain.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p4-5, por
Record #:
28930
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Abstract:
The John C. Campbell Folk School teaches the crafts, techniques, and tools that people used in western North Carolina. The school was started by Olive Dame Campbell and Marguerite Butler who believed the quality of life could be improved by education.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Summer 2000, p6-7, por
Record #:
4498
Author(s):
Abstract:
Commissioned through the Artworks for State Buildings program, the sonic plaza at East Carolina University's Joyner Library is the creation of internationally known sound artist Christopher Janney. The three-hundred-foot plaza contains columns that produce sounds as people walk by and activate electronic beams; a percussive water wall; a twelve-foot swirling circle of water vapor; and a clock tower.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p8, il
Record #:
4497
Author(s):
Abstract:
The newest addition to the Art in the Park program at the North Carolina Zoological Park is a herd of sculptured bronze elephants weighing twelve tons. Created by Peter J. Woytuk, the elephants \"graze\" near the park's entrance. The art program is supported largely by donors. Long-term plans call for ninety more commissions, including visual art, music, and residencies.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p6, il
Record #:
4496
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Traditional musicians abound in the mountains. Seventeen-year-old Josh Goforth of Madison County is one example. He started playing the piano at age four and later mastered many instruments, including mandolin, banjo, guitar, and fiddle. He also writes music and plays in a number of bands. He plans to go to college to study music education, then return home to teach marching band.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p5, il
Record #:
4500
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Abstract:
A fire-gutted Presbyterian church in downtown Charlotte is under restoration to provide space for the Tryon Center for Visual Art. Bank of America provided a $7 million grant for restoration funding, and when completed, the center will house sixteen studios, all Internet wired; space for exhibitions; a library; common areas; and meeting rooms.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1999, p8, il
Record #:
4495
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Duck decoy carving has a long tradition in the Core Banks area. Jason Michels, 22, of Harkers Island, has been carving and painting decoys for the past five years. His skillful work has won him numerous local and national awards, including ones from the prestigious Ward World Championship Waterfowl Carving Championship, held in Maryland.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p3, il
Record #:
4499
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Abstract:
Charlotte's new Mint Museum of Craft + Design, located in the 1953 Montaldo's Building, opened in January 1999. The 82,000-square-foot structure was renovated through a $9.5 million grant from Bank of America. The museum features the state's craft traditions in furniture, ceramics, textiles, and studio glass through permanent collections and galleries housing changing exhibitions.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p9, il
Record #:
4501
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The North Carolina Folk Heritage Award recognizes those individuals whose work preserves the cultural traditions of families and communities. Among the 1998 winners are Bessie Killens Eldreth, traditional mountain singer; Louise Bigmeat Maney, Cherokee potter; Arliss Watford, woodcarver; and Ossie Clark Phillips, quilter.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 12 Issue 3, Spring 1998, p6-7, por
Record #:
4502
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May 1998, Jean McLaughlin became director of the Penland School of Crafts, the nationally known center for craft education. McLaughlin is the sixty-nine-year-old center's sixth director. Previously she was with the NC Arts Council for sixteen years, director of Visual Arts for thirteen years, and director of Statewide Initiatives for three.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. Issue 3, Spring 1998, p10, por