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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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93 results for "NC Arts"
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Record #:
28864
Abstract:
The State of North Carolina declared 1986 the Year of the Native American. The purpose is to educate citizens about their Indian heritage and the role Indians have played in the state’s history. Festivals, symposia, exhibits, concerts and commemorations will mark the entire year.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 2 Issue 3, May 1986, p3, il
Record #:
28910
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arts Council developed a plan framework of key issues to consider in 1995-1997. The identified priorities include support for artists and organizations, racial and cultural equity, arts in communities and education.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Winter/Spring 1994, p1-4, il, por
Record #:
28900
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina touring companies and artists are dedicated to serving communities and creating new relationships across the state. Some of the new priorities in touring are promoting cultural diversity among school children, defining the long term residency, and outreach in rural communities.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1991, p1-3, por
Record #:
28902
Author(s):
Abstract:
Etta Baker was a Piedmont blues guitarist and singer from Morganton, North Carolina. Wayne Martin and the North Carolina Arts Council initiated the production of Etta Baker: One Dime Blues in 1988. Martin recorded hours of tape of Baker’s music in her home, documentation that will be available for researchers and scholars of traditional music.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p7, por
Record #:
4502
Author(s):
Abstract:
In May 1998, Jean McLaughlin became director of the Penland School of Crafts, the nationally known center for craft education. McLaughlin is the sixty-nine-year-old center's sixth director. Previously she was with the NC Arts Council for sixteen years, director of Visual Arts for thirteen years, and director of Statewide Initiatives for three.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. Issue 3, Spring 1998, p10, por
Record #:
2694
Author(s):
Abstract:
A residency at the Headlands Center for the Arts near San Francisco afforded Jacksonville storyteller Louise Anderson the opportunity to explore different places, voices, arts, and cultures.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Winter 1991, p1-3, il
Record #:
28872
Abstract:
Historic buildings in North Carolina are finding new uses in housing the arts. Adaptive use projects have restored and re-purposed historic buildings as spaces for performance arts, community development, museums, art centers and galleries.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 2 Issue 4, July 1986, p10-11, il
Record #:
28890
Abstract:
The North Carolina Visiting Artist Program has facilitated the availability of new and creative art forms, ideas and talented artists in communities across the state. Andrew Braitman, an artist in the program, describes his experience in the program and how it influenced his work.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p10-11, il, por
Record #:
28933
Author(s):
Abstract:
The St. Joseph’s Historic Foundation, Inc. has launched the African American Cultural Tourism Website. A project funded by the North Carolina Arts Council, the site offers visitors information about fourteen of the state’s most prominent African American cultural organizations.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 15 Issue 2, Winter 2001, p10
Record #:
9342
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fayetteville is the first town named for the Marquis de Lafayette, and the town is celebrating the 250th anniversary of his birth with a year-long series of events. Wright discusses some of the town's early history, its heavy involvement with the military, and downtown revitalization.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 65 Issue 6, June 2007, p42-45, il, por
Record #:
4500
Author(s):
Abstract:
A fire-gutted Presbyterian church in downtown Charlotte is under restoration to provide space for the Tryon Center for Visual Art. Bank of America provided a $7 million grant for restoration funding, and when completed, the center will house sixteen studios, all Internet wired; space for exhibitions; a library; common areas; and meeting rooms.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1999, p8, il
Record #:
4497
Author(s):
Abstract:
The newest addition to the Art in the Park program at the North Carolina Zoological Park is a herd of sculptured bronze elephants weighing twelve tons. Created by Peter J. Woytuk, the elephants \"graze\" near the park's entrance. The art program is supported largely by donors. Long-term plans call for ninety more commissions, including visual art, music, and residencies.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 13 Issue 2, Winter 1999, p6, il
Record #:
28886
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina artists give their perspectives on the challenges presented when working in a public context. Among these challenges are the specific sites of public art, scale, concessions to utility and public taste, and developing public awareness.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p9-11, il, por
Record #:
28885
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Art-in-State Buildings Program, managed by the Visual Arts Section of the North Carolina Arts Council, is a process of utilizing an appropriation from the General Assembly to place art in or around government buildings. The process of selection and placement of art in public spaces is discussed.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p4-5, il
Record #:
28920
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Art for Public Spaces Bill was introduced in the North Carolina Senate in mid-march. The bill calls for one-percent of the construction costs for new and remodeled state properties to be used for art. While modifications were made in the new legislation to make the program stronger, valuable and effective elements in the former Artworks for State Buildings Program were left intact.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Fall 1997, p7, il