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137 results for "Local Government Law Bulletin"
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Record #:
21844
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\"In 2006, the NC General Assembly enacted sweeping reform legislation (S.L. 2006-201) aimed at addressing public concern that grew out of the campaign and legislative activities of some of the state's top public officials. These new provisions established ethical standards for state officials and imposed broad new regulations on those officials and on individuals and entities seeking to influence their actions.\" This bulletin reflects the current state of the law through the 2013 session.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 135, Mar 2014, p1-35, f
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Record #:
22031
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This bulletin is an annotated catalog of exceptions and special rules that are judicially created for the benefit of counties, cities, and other types of local government entities.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 136, May 2014, p1-28, f
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Record #:
19783
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This bulletin focuses on two aspects of HUB [Historically Underutilized Businesses] participation in local government contracting: Part I outlines the statutory requirements under the North Carolina law for HUB participation in public construction and repair projects, while Part II examines the constitutional limitations placed on such programs by federal court jurisprudence.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 131, Feb 2013, p1-28, bibl, f
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Record #:
20780
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This bulletin reviews North Carolina case law on using mandamus to require enforcement of local ordinances. A Writ of Mandamus, when issued, directs a public officer to perform a specific duty. It exists to relieve the frustration of persons who are entitled to have an officer take a specific action but face a persistent refusal by the officer top do so. The NC Supreme Court identified five elements necessary to a successful mandamus suit.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 132, Jul 2013, p1-19, f
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Record #:
20782
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This bulletin analyzes the free public services doctrine that denies recovery against a person or agency that commits a civil wrong, either intentionally or through negligence by a governmental agency that has incurred costs in remedying the public health or public safety hazards caused by the person or agencies' negligence.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 134, Aug 2013, p1-6, f
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Record #:
20781
Abstract:
This bulletin analyzes whether elected or appointed local government board members can legally participate in meetings without being physically present. It also describes legal and practical issues that could be addressed in a local policy allowing remote participation.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 133, Aug 2013, p1-10, f
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Record #:
18578
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One statutory option a city or county has in enforcing its ordinances is to impose a civil penalty on a violator, and if necessary, sue for the penalty in a civil action in the nature of the debt. This article considers the question of whether the ordinance being enforced must set out an exact dollar amount for each penalty, to be sued for regardless of circumstances, or whether it may set out a dollar range for penalties and leave to an administrative official or board the decision as to the amount of the penalty in any individual instance.
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Record #:
18579
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Both cities and counties enjoy statutory authority to enforce their ordinances through civil penalties, which if necessary can be collected in a civil action in the nature of the debt. The North Carolina General Statues sets the upper limit of the fines or penalties for local ordinances enforced as misdemeanors or infractions, but there is no statutory maximum for civil penalties in general.
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Record #:
19757
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This bulletin is an updated version of two earlier bulletins by A. Fleming Bell, II, and Norma Houston: \"2006-2009 State Ethics and Lobbying Reform Statutes,\" No. 122, and \"2006-2010: State Ethics and Lobbying Reform Statutes,\" No. 123. The bulletin reflects the current state of the law through the 2012 session.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 129, Oct 2012, p1-34, f
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Record #:
19784
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Several methods are available to cities and counties when enforcing their ordinances. Criminal enforcement is one, with the punishment usually being the payment of a fine. Another method is civil enforcement through an action in the nature of a debt, with the punishment being the payment of a penalty. This bulletin explores the differences that can result because a city or county decides to enforce a particular ordinance through one or the other method of enforcement.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 130, Dec 2012, p1-9, f
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Record #:
16206
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North Carolina, like a number of other states, has a set of statutes and regulations governing the control of rabies. This bulletin contains a summary of the history of the rabies control laws; an overview of the laws' major components, including recent changes; and highlights areas where local government ordinances and board of health rules also play a role in the control of the disease.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 125, Oct 2011, p1-25, f
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Record #:
16217
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Normally someone who is not a party to a contract has no standing to enforce or challenge the validity of the contract, nor any right to seek damages for its breach. Occasionally, however, courts recognize and enforce nonparty rights in a contract, as third-party beneficiaries. This bulletin explores the application of third-party beneficiary rules to contracts entered into by local governments in North Carolina.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 126, Dec 2011, p1-14, f
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Record #:
16205
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This bulletin summarizes the law of de facto officers in the state. It distinguishes between de jure officers and de facto officers, it sets out the variety of circumstances in which the courts have recognized have recognized a person as a de facto officer, and it discusses the circumstances in which the courts have found persons to be \"intruders,\" or \"usurpers,\" that is, persons whose actions are not valid.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 124, Oct 2010, p1-15, f
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Record #:
16216
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The 2006 N.C. General Assembly short session passed a significant new law--the State Government Ethics Act, which established ethical standards for the conduct of state officials in all three branches of government and imposed new regulations and restrictions on those entities and individuals who seek to influence them. These laws have been amended every session since 2006. This bulletin reflects the current state of the law through the 2010 legislative short session.
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Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 123, Sept 2010, p1-30, f
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Record #:
11046
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Almost all of the state's local governments are subject to statutory requirements that govern purchases and other contracts. These requirements have increased in number and complexity over the past twenty-five years; at the same time local governments have also been adopting their own purchasing requirements. Youens provides an overview of these statutory requirements and demonstrates how to reconcile local government policies with them.
Source:
Local Government Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7830 A15 L6), Vol. Issue 118, Feb 2009, p1-17, il, f
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