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250 results for "Carolina Comments"
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Record #:
2691
Abstract:
Photography's popularity increased in the state between 1865 and 1900, with about 450 itinerant and resident photographers working. Included for the first time were women and Afro-American photographers.
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Record #:
2805
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With photography increasing in popularity between 1865 and 1900, around 450 itinerant and resident photographers found employment statewide. A listing of them is included.
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Record #:
3274
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The N.C. Division of Archives and History's new site on the World Wide Web, http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/, offers information on the division, historic attractions, preservation and conservation, and research and records.
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Record #:
6227
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Turner recounts the story of Thomas H. Davis, a native of Winston-Salem, and how he built Piedmont Airlines into one of the nation's largest airlines. In the late 1980s, Piedmont was acquired by USAir.
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Carolina Comments (NoCar F 251 C38), Vol. 49 Issue 5, Sept 2001, p104-112, il, bibl Periodical Website
Record #:
16232
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James Holeman (March 15, 1800-October 17, 1874) was a wealthy farmer and state politician. Nine letters written to his wife while he served on the North Carolina General Assembly are reproduced in this piece.
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Record #:
16853
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The Historical Records Survey, part of the Works Progress Administration, hired unemployed clerks, stenographers, and teachers to catalog and protect public records in an effort to aid historians, archivists, and curators. The program ran for five years between 1935 and 1940 and operated out of Raleigh. One hundred and ten workers were given the task of focusing on information from the clerk of court and register of deeds from the state's 100 counties.
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Record #:
5023
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Reedy recounts her experiences working as an intern in the summer of 2000 with the Underwater Archaeology Unit of the Division of Archives and History. Reedy assisted in identifying, cleaning, and cataloging artifacts from what is believed to be Blackbeard's flagship, the Queen Anne's Revenge.
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Record #:
16714
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A project to construct additional parking in Raleigh led to the discovery of a time capsule from 1860. Staff archaeologist John W. Clauser halted construction on the hunch that the monument, to be destroyed during construction, be inspected further. Clauser's hunch was correct and a rusted tin box contained illegible papers, parts of scripture, antebellum coins, railroad artifacts, and various tools.
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Record #:
16727
Abstract:
The Division of Archives and History is the largest over-arching state agency in charge of cultural heritage and within this department, many other branches exist which oversee different aspects of the state's cultural material. Mr. Misenheimer, Jr. was assistant director of the North Carolina Division of Archives and History and describes responsibilities and intricacies of each department, along with an annual summary for 1988.
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Record #:
1900
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Two sketchbooks by a Union soldier, James Wells Champney, have been acquired by the North Carolina Maritime History Council. Nearly 400 drawings depict camp, fort, and African-American life in Eastern North Carolina during the war.
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Record #:
15976
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Wreckage discovered in 1996 was initially thought to be remains of the Queen Anne's Revenge. Further study by professional archaeologists in October 1997 has further substantiated this claim with discovery of fourteen large cannons thus far. Further fieldwork was planned to provide additional evidence that these remains in fact represent Blackbeard's ship lost in 1718.
Record #:
5021
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From the slave period until 1898, African Americans in Eastern North Carolina observed a Christmastime custom called Jonkonnu. The practice originated in Jamaica and spread to North Carolina, which was the only state where it was observed. Jonkonnu is a unique blend of West African and English customs. In 2000, the Christmas tradition was revived during New Bern's annual Holiday Candlelight Tours.
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Record #:
1584
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Camp Davis, located on the southern coast between Wilmington and present-day Topsail Island, was an important U.S. military installation in the years just before and during U.S. involvement in World War II.
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Record #:
13727
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Cecelski reports on a 2009 community oral history project in New Bern, titled \"African American Voices Between Two River.\" Over two dozen elderly black community leaders in Craven County were interviewed, and the project focused on African Americans born in the 1920s, 30s, and 40s. These individuals lived in the aftermath of one of the worst disasters in North Carolina history - the great New Bern fire of 1922.
Source:
Carolina Comments (NoCar F 251 C38), Vol. 58 Issue 4, Oct 2010, p123-127, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
15679
Abstract:
Alamance Battleground Research Project focused on compiling new archaeological data and reviewing historic documents to elucidate the events of May 16, 1771. On that date Regulators met the state's militia in the cumulative battle of the War of Regulation, which ended in defeat of the uprising farmers. The project drew on help from professionals and over two hundred volunteers.
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