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9 results for Weather forecasting
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Record #:
196
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Abstract:
The National Climatic Data Center is based in Asheville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 9, Feb 1992, p24-26, il
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Record #:
2518
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Abstract:
Captain William H. Boudinot of Chatham County, an 1837 U.S. Naval Academy graduate, devised in 1856 a way to gather weather information for forecasting. Ignored for years, his ideas eventually laid the foundation for the weather service.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 3, Aug 1987, p12, il
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Record #:
4161
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Abstract:
One hundred years ago people had little forewarning when a natural disaster, such as a hurricane or tornado, was about to strike. For example, Outer Banks residents had little notice of the Old August Storm of 1899 that flooded Hatteras Island with three to ten feet of water. Today a vast array of technology, including satellites, television, radio, and computers, keep people appraised of dangerous weather threats.
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Record #:
8247
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beginning in 1886, the State Weather Service was managed by both the United States Signal Service and the N.C. Agricultural Experiment, part of what was then the College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts (now North Carolina State University). The U.S. Department of Agriculture took over responsibility for the weather service in 1891 and renamed it the United States Weather Bureau. The Agricultural Experimental Station would send weather report telegrams to certain railroad stations where volunteers would then display signal flags that showed local weather conditions. In 1892, daily weather maps giving temperature, precipitation, barometric pressure, and wind direction were distributed to fifty locations across the state. A year later, 500 post offices throughout the state were receiving the forecast data reproduced on postcards by the railroad displaymen. Ever since it was established, the weather service, by whatever name, has lived up to its purposes of collecting weather data, disseminating practical information, forecasting weather, and warnings about frost or cold-waves.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Sept 1983, p14, 39, il
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Record #:
8328
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are many ways to tell if it is going to rain besides the newspaper. Folk traditions involve things such as: the direction a lizard sits on a fence post, the location of a spider web, the way fireflies fly, where cows lie down, and cricket songs. The most important predictions are made on July 15, the day honoring St. Swithin's, the patron saint of the farmer. Current weather phenomena might also predict future weather. It is said, for example, fog on a southerly wind will bring rain, while halos around the sun foretell stormy weather.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p8-9, por
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Record #:
14638
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Asheville is a long way from the fighting fronts, but it plays an important part in directing engagements in all parts of the world as the headquarters of the Army Air Forces Weather Wing.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 2, June 1944, p1-2, 22, f
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Record #:
25775
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Abstract:
Working with NASA, the Federal Aviation Administration, and numerous other partners, Dr. Paul J. Kauffmann, chairman of the East Carolina Department of Technology Systems, has tested the commercial feasibility of a new weather data collection system that might prevent unnecessary flying accidents.
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Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2005, p20-23, il Periodical Website
Record #:
34301
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Pacific cold sea surface event called La Niña is persisting and is predicted to hold on into 2000. The longer-term climate effects in North Carolina could be a continued deficit of normal rainfall into the spring. Because La Niña increases hurricane activity in the Atlantic, the state could see increased storm activity in the fall and short-term relief from drought conditions.
Record #:
34459
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The National Weather Service conducts service assessments after every large weather event. This article pertains to the three assessments conducted after Hurricane Harvey by Sea Grant and other operations, and how National Weather Service professionals and emergency management personnel work together to ensure the safety of the communities they serve.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2017, p23-24, il, map Periodical Website