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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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21 results for Transportation
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Record #:
29768
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The Piedmont Triad region of North Carolina is quickly becoming a titan of transportation. Due to strong infrastructure in the transportation, distribution, and logistics sectors, and hubs for companies like FedEx, more transportation manufacturing and industries are moving into the area.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Sept 2008, p24-25, por, map
Record #:
36577
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This nonprofit organization, offering bicycles at affordable prices and the opportunity to learn how to repair and build a bicycle. With bicycle parts donated and business operated by volunteers, Asheville ReCyclery offers more than relatively affordable transportation to school or work. It means helping others improve their lives while contributing to a sense of community.
Record #:
36457
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This nonprofit organization, established nearly a decade earlier, sustained success due to its celebration, education, and advocacy of life on two wheels for both urban and commuter cyclists. Events included coordinating community rides such as the Bike of the Irish. Lobbying for transportation policy changes yielded the Hominy Creek Greenway and the non-profit’s collaboration with the city council in the creation of Asheville’s Comprehensive Bicycle Plan.
Record #:
21632
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This article examines the North Carolina government's attempts to improve economic condition of the state during the Antebellum Period. North Carolina was very dependent on its neighboring states for economic support following the American Revolution. On the suggestion of several North Carolina governors, the General Assembly sponsored programs to improve the condition of the state's roads, railways, and waterways.
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Record #:
36569
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Asheville’s Council on Aging offers services allowing elderly people on fixed incomes to live independently and economically in their own residences. The nonprofit organization provides services free of charge such as minor household repairs; Call-a-Ride, for those unable to drive or access public transportation; 911 Emergency Cell Phones, for at-risk seniors; In-Home Aide Services, to assist with completing daily tasks; Heat Relief, which provides fans and air conditioners during the summer. Funds and labor are provided primarily through the support of volunteers and donations from individuals.
Record #:
35895
Author(s):
Abstract:
How to get there was transportation of the two wheeled, self- propelled variety: bicycles. Encouraging people to forego four wheeled transport were directing them toward the virtues of scenic routes; route guides; route maps; and its ecological and fiscal frugality.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 7, Sept 1980, p22
Record #:
10986
Abstract:
When We the People of North Carolina magazine interviewed Lauch Faircloth, Chairman of the State Highway Commission, in July 1969, he had been in office less than six months. In this interview, Faircloth discusses current policies, accomplishments, and plans for the future.
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Record #:
10900
Abstract:
We the People of North Carolina magazine interviews Lauch Faircloth, Chairman of the State Highway Commission, on the status of the state's highway system.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 7, July 1969, p42-43, 100, por
Record #:
8027
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North Carolina's population is growing, but the state's transportation infrastructure is not. By NC Department of Transportation estimates, transportation needs over the next twenty-five years will exceed funding by more than $30 billion. Carstarphen, the chair of NC Go!, the state's only broad-based statewide transportation advocacy organization, discusses the looming crisis in transportation and presents a five-point plan to address the problem.
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Record #:
36307
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Abstract:
The ELF—a conglomeration of a car, bike, and trike—intends to ease traveling in an increasingly urbanized world. Companies on a roll with this form of transportation include the profiled Organic Transit of Durham and its European counterpart, Schaeffler AG. Promotion of the product included these advantages: safer than a bicycle, more weather resistant than a scooter, and not subject to laws related to the electronic bike market.
Record #:
21178
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the colonial period, eastern North Carolina possessed an inadequate and underdeveloped system of roads. To better road conditions, the colony tried appointing road commissioners, building bridges at public expense and putting up signposts and mile markers. Though they tried to improve the road network, the failure to enforce laws, the physical obstacles of the state's geography and shortages in the labor pool kept road conditions poor.
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Record #:
36275
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On the downside to the takeover of AI in employment sectors: the elimination of jobs traditionally targeted for elimination, such as factory work; the elimination of highly paid positions such as software designing. Changes that may be a mixed blessing include a minimum guaranteed income provided by the government. However, what may be criticized now as a sign of a socialistic society may one day be regarded as the basis of economic survival.
Record #:
22329
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Various policies and types of state aid were used to create and repair the transportation networks in early North Carolina.
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Record #:
6189
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Six small transportation museums spread across the state highlight the machines that move us by land, sea, and air. These include the Carolina Aviation Museum (Charlotte); C. Grier Beam Truck Museum (Charlotte); the Daniel Stowe Carriage House, part of the Gaston County Museum (Dallas); Piedmont Carolina Railroad Museum (Belmont); North Carolina Maritime Museum, Southport Branch; and the Norlina Museum (Norlina).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 6, Nov 2003, p122-124, 126, 128, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8295
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By the 1950s, Malcolm McLean of Robeson County had built one of the country's biggest transportation firms, the McLean Trucking Company. In 1956, he turned an idea he had been thinking about since 1937 into a reality. His invention 'containerized shipping' revolutionized the world of shipping. His idea was to build a tractor-trailer truck in which the trailer part could be lifted onto a ship or onto railroad cars, without anyone touching the contents, and transported to a particular destination, where it was loaded back onto a truck and delivered to the customers.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 46 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p22-23, il