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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Tourism industry
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Record #:
14559
Abstract:
At long last the eastern Cherokee Indians have decided to get ready for, and to profit from, the influx of tourists who are pouring over the Blue Ridge Parkway and the mountain roads into their homes.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 29, Dec 1945, p3-4, 20, f
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Record #:
24368
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Abstract:
The tourism industry in North Carolina boomed in 1987, and the industry's impact is steadily increasing. Charlotte is just one community where hotels are providing jobs close to home and capitalizing on the tourism market.
Record #:
24655
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The author provides and inventory of things to do, places to go, and sights to see in the North Carolina in 1959.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 26, May 1959, p7-52, il, map
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Record #:
24838
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Tourism agencies call Western North Carolina “The Land of the Sky,” but few know the history of how the phrase was coined. In 1875, Salisbury author Frances Fisher Tiernan. known professionally as Christian Reid, published “The Land of the Sky; or, Adventures in Mountain By-Ways,” which was set in Western North Carolina. The book was extremely popular and within a few years, the title became a common marketing phrase for hotels and other businesses in the region.
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Record #:
27691
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Although Moore County is most known for its golfing opportunities, tourism is not the only industry that drives the economy. Diversification has brought in new businesses that take advantage of resources unique to the county. Such industries as real-estate agents and economic developers (like Situs Group LLC); R. Riveter which hires military spouses to make high-end bags from surplus military materials; Reitz Fan and Blower Inc.; Pactiv LLC, the world’s largest food packaging and food-service products producer; and health care all create the fabric of the Moore County economy.
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Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, January 2017, p94, 96, 98, 100-101, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
28922
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Abstract:
Wayne Martin, folk life director at the North Carolina Arts Council, explained how traditional arts are an integral part of the culture of North Carolina and can contribute to a wealth of opportunities in cultural tourism. If done well, heritage tourism spurs economic development and helps preserve cultural traditions at the same time.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 12 Issue 2, Winter 1998, p3, por
Record #:
29254
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's travel and tourism industry is a $7 billion business employing more than 250,000 people, only overshadowed by agriculture as an economic powerhouse. However, in recent years the industry is losing ground to other states and executives are working to reverse the trend and work with other industries for ground-breaking initiatives.
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NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 8, August 1991, p16, 18, 21-22, il, por
Record #:
29255
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Abstract:
There is an ongoing concern over North Carolina's occupancy taxes, and who they should benefit. For the state's travel and tourism industry, especially Convention and Visitors Bureaus, the occupancy tax should go to travel and tourism, just as gas taxes and other highway-use fees go toward building and maintaining highways.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 8, Aug 1991, p20
Record #:
29280
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Abstract:
Every year, millions of Canadian tourists come to North and South Carolina for the mild weather, beaches, and golf. In early December, Governor Jim Hunt proclaimed ‘Canadian Days’ in North Carolina to be held from February 1 through March 15. This is part of an effort to plan, promote, and accommodate tourism in a more efficient way.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p36-37, il
Record #:
30789
Author(s):
Abstract:
An important source of public revenue, tourism is one of the North Carolina's major industries. From the mountains to the coast, the travel industry brings vast indirect benefits and initial cash returns to not only associated businesses but also other industries such as textiles, furniture, and tobacco. Dollars earned through food, lodging, gas, and entertainment, funnel back to the tax payer, helping with education and infrastructure development.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 16 Issue 2, June 1958, p10, 12, 14, 16, 49
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Record #:
30791
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Travel Council provides leadership in the state's tourism industry, which is currently comprised of loosely related businesses and thousands of independent operators. Providing a voice for the tourist industry to the state, the Travel Council also sponsors projects such as the anti-littering campaign, 'Keep North Carolina Beautiful' Program, and an informational sign program in cooperation with the State Highway Commission.
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Record #:
31245
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1962 set a new record in North Carolina when tourists left behind $270 million dollars, contributing 89 million to personal income and 18 million to the state revenue. Together, tourists provided $445 million to the industry in North Carolina, 6% above 1961.
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Record #:
32323
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Abstract:
The economics of travel and tourism in North Carolina have grown enormously, with almost one-billion dollars spent by travelers during the past decade. This article provides facts and figures on the state travel industry, and highlights some of the state’s attractions.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 8, Aug 1969, p20-23, il, por