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6 results for Tobacco--Research
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Record #:
9259
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Benjamin Ershoff and Dr. Samuel Wildman, both research biologists at the University of California at Los Angeles, have recently discovered the tobacco leaf contains the protein fraction-1. Fraction-1 contains all of the essential amino acids and can be used to supplement low-protein diets and help to meet nutritional requirements of patients suffering gastro-intestinal disorders. The protein yield from an acre of tobacco is four times that of a soybean field, and tobacco protein has no odor or taste.\r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 2, July 1978, p12-13, 37, il
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Record #:
31562
Author(s):
Abstract:
A North Carolina State University study examined bulk curers on twenty-four farms in Red Springs of Robeson County to determine whether a load control program would adversely affect tobacco production and farmers’ attitudes. The study found that tobacco is completely unharmed when cured in bulk barns where the fans are automatically turned off for brief periods when demand for electricity is highest.
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Record #:
31585
Author(s):
Abstract:
Off-and-on operation of the fans on bulk tobacco barns can reduce the barns’ power consumption without damaging the tobacco or extending the time required to cure it. That conclusion was made from the results of field tests at tobacco farms across Eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Jan 1977, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31630
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preliminary experimental findings indicate that bulk tobacco barns can be used successfully with off-and-on operation of their circulation systems without harming the cured leaf. The “bad” news is that the results will not be conclusive until after the growing season this year. Tests are being conducted by North Carolina State University agricultural engineers at fifteen farms in eleven North Carolina counties.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 9, Sept 1976, p20-21, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31067
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists at the North Carolina State College are shedding light on an important mystery of the tobacco plant--the source of its smell. Related to the tobacco gums secreted by the leaf hairs, tobacco's aroma can be studied using the chemistry of the trichomes.
Subject(s):
Record #:
10054
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the summer of 1888, Creedmoor, in Granville County, was the site of a thriving tobacco market. Then a disease, later named the Granville wilt for the location where it was found in the country, struck. The market later closed; farm values went down, and many farmers lost their property. Debnam recounts the story of E. G. Moss and Dr. Thomas E. Smith, who were largely responsible for solving this agricultural problem which threatened the area's tobacco economy.
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