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14 results for Rural health services
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23
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Residents of Madison County are the beneficiaries of a program, Community Oriented Primary Care (COPC), that combines old-fashioned health care with the latest medical technology.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 9 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p7-10, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
40
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Betts examines the utilization of and the services provided by the state's rural hospitals, and identifies sixteen North Carolina hospitals that are at risk of failing to meet their service objectives.
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Record #:
1851
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This is the first in a series of articles and pictorials documenting North Carolina's community health-care projects, which make health care accessible to uninsured people and to people in remote areas of the state.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 34, Aug 1994, p10-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
1883
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the second in a series of articles and pictorials documenting North Carolina's community health-care projects, which make health care accessible to uninsured people and to remote areas.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 35, Aug 1994, p16-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
13987
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Abstract:
One of the few remaining country doctors left in North Carolina, Dr. Jefferson Davis Bulla of Randolph County is still going strong at 89.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 41, Mar 1951, p11, f
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Record #:
18352
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Abstract:
Rurality of North Carolina has crated a severe dilemma in health care because it is difficult to make medical services readily available. Although by no means complete, North Carolina is solving this problem through physician recruitment and increase in health departments.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Fall 1979, p1-9, map, f
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Record #:
25716
Author(s):
Abstract:
Centered at East Carolina, The North Carolina Agromedicine Institute has received a $3 million grant to establish the Southeast Coastal Center for Agromedicine, to promote health and safety for workers and communities in agricultural, forestry and fisheries industries.
Source:
Edge (NoCar LD 1741 E44 E33), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p32 Periodical Website
Record #:
31288
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina Congressman Mike McIntyre discusses efforts toward good health care in rural communities. As co-chairman of the Rural Health Care Coalition, McIntyre helped introduce the Triple-A Rural Health Improvement Act, which addresses accessibility, affordability and accountability of health care services.
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Record #:
31652
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The Rural Practice Project is a new national program, administered by the University of North Carolina School of Medicine at Chapel Hill, to establish twenty-five model community medical practices in small towns throughout the United States. The aim of the program is to find new ways of providing health care to rural residents at an affordable price.
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Record #:
31658
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Representative Richardson Preyer serves as the Sixth District’s Congressman and former judge in Greensboro. In this report, Preyer discusses the preservation of rural life, rural development, and health services for rural communities.
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Record #:
31688
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In a message delivered before a joint session of the General Assembly on April 12, Governor Jim Holshouser prescribed a comprehensive program for coping with the lack of adequate medical services in rural areas. As he pointed out, the problem is too complex to be cured by a single simple remedy, but a start must be made. Holshouser presents his speech in this article.
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Record #:
31706
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Governor Jim Holshouser discusses rural health care in North Carolina and plans for a medical school at East Carolina University. He also discusses trends in the medical profession, which include the lack of small town family physicians, the overflow of primary care, and the lack of accessible primary medical care.
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Record #:
31714
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Abstract:
Governor Jim Holshouser has recommended a system of community health clinics staffed by “physician extenders” to address the shortage of medical care in rural communities. As a first phase in the program, five community health clinics will open next year. Details of the program and operations are discussed in this article.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 12, Dec 1973, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
32011
Author(s):
Abstract:
Medical professionals tend to seek jobs in city hospitals, but they are also needed in rural areas and small towns. Several anonymous general practitioners comment on their problems and their satisfactions of the medical profession in rural North Carolina.
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