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9 results for Roads--Economic aspects
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Record #:
3393
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ten of the highway projects to be built from 1999 through 2008 will have a major impact on the state's economic development. Projects include outer loops for Charlotte, Greensboro, and Raleigh, and the Manteo bypass.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 55 Issue 8, Aug 1997, p38-40,44-46, il
Record #:
7276
Author(s):
Abstract:
The lifeblood of the retailer is a sound and reliable transportation system. In North Carolina this means good roads. Both multinational companies and the local mom-and-pop businesses depend upon them. Employees and customers, supplies and completed products must all be able to move with dispatch from Point A to Point B. Towle discusses the importance of a good road system to North Carolina's economic health.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 7, July 2005, p36, 38, 40-42, il
Record #:
24330
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article presents the slow and cumbersome process of road building by providing readers with the example of how I-85 and I-40 merge in Alamance County, causing a bottleneck situation and traffic. North Carolina politicians underinvested in its transportation network over the past thirty years, and motorists are paying dearly for it today.
Record #:
24334
Author(s):
Abstract:
A planned extension of I-26 begins in Charleston, South Carolina and ends in Asheville, North Carolina. The project has angered environmentalists but much of the region’s business community anticipates and interstate that links western North Carolina to the Ohio Valley and industrial Midwest. This article examines the pros and cons of the expansion.
Record #:
24331
Author(s):
Abstract:
Interstate highways attract business and foster growth. Charlotte is an example a commercial center benefitting from the presence of interstates, specifically, I-85 and I-77.
Record #:
24332
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nearly three years after the completion if I-40, many rural counties are still waiting for an influx of jobs and development. Areas around Raleigh and Wilmington, however, have grown.
Record #:
24457
Author(s):
Abstract:
The completion of I-40 a year ago brought changes throughout North Carolina. It created a convenient corridor for those travelling from the Piedmont to southern North Carolina beaches, bringing business to towns along the way.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p46-48, il
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Record #:
27412
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state will cut 400 million dollars from its budget for the fiscal year and almost half will be cut from education. Meanwhile, the highway construction package will receive zero cuts and will cost 9.2 billion dollars. Money could be shifted from the highway fund to prevent cuts in education which provide a greater return on investment than does building roads. NC legislators are unlikely to do this as lobbying is strong, but cutting education spending will likely hurt the students of NC.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 19, May 8-14 1991, p5-6 Periodical Website
Record #:
31491
Author(s):
Abstract:
As North Carolina increases its role as industrial center and its way of life reaches a broader scope and faster tempo, highway needs also grow. To meet these needs funds from the $300 million road bond issued by Governor Dan Moore have been approved.
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