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5 results for Raleigh--Streets
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Record #:
27729
Author(s):
Abstract:
From July 2013 to July 2014, Raleigh had 98 car-bike crashes. The city has many bikers and biking groups and is taking steps to help keep them safe. The city is designing improvements in heavily trafficked areas, painting bike routes with green paint, and constructing at least 27 miles of marked, on-road bicycle lanes.
Source:
Record #:
3368
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the first half of the 20th century, segregation in Raleigh made it difficult for blacks to find eating, sleeping, shopping, and entertainment businesses. East Hargett Street developed to meet these needs.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 24, July 1997, p11,13-14, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24747
Author(s):
Abstract:
The city of Raleigh dates back to the late eighteenth century and it has undergone a number of structural changes ever since. Author Scott Huler examines Raleigh through the history of its streets and parks, reflecting on how the early grid system influenced Raleigh’s growth over the years.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 7, December 2015, p58. 60, 62, 64, 66-67, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
24394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Almost 30,000 people now work in the two million square feet of office space built along the I-40 corridor in Raleigh. The buildings, however, still have high vacancy rates as the city tries to attract business. Some people consider the I-40 corridor as the new main street in Raleigh, while others maintain that Fayetteville Street has and always will be the main street. Both areas, however, have much to offer the city by way of access to state capital business and finance.
Record #:
27840
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh’s City Council is planning to review the Hillsborough Street plan and include bike lanes in the plan. The state Department of Transportation will have the final say as the street is a state road. The DoT has said the original plan without bike lanes is safer. Cycling enthusiasts are lobbying for the change to make Raleigh and downtown transportation more bike-friendly.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 5, February 2010, p5-7 Periodical Website