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14 results for Poverty
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Record #:
36313
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Unemployment related factors discussed were housing insecurity and transportation struggles. Such factors, coupled with low wage jobs, can create a cycle of poverty hard to escape and easy to perpetuate. Such factors also ranked Charlotte on the bottom of a Harvard University-sponsored economic mobility study. On the upside to this downward spiral were individuals such as Traletta Banks, an instructor showing others how to break the cycle with options such as creating career pathways. Also part of the effort was Economic Mobility Initiative, a nonprofit helping individuals on the road to self-sufficiency overcome roadblocks such as benefits cliff.
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36450
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A creative endeavor Charlotte’s gallery and museum communities activated and Jessica Moss advocated was Roll Up. This project, taking artists out into impoverished and vulnerable parts of town, included underrepresented human subjects in its artwork. Events showcasing these artworks included the New Gallery of Modern Art’s BlackBlooded.
Record #:
29057
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Durham Mayor Bill Bell has attempted to reduce poverty and revitalize inner-city neighborhoods for the past sixteen years. During this time, Durham’s downtown has seen a renaissance but the poverty rate has risen. A new initiative called Transformation in Ten is a coordinated effort to address the causes and symptoms of poverty, including housing, finance, jobs, public safety, health and education.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 22, June 2017, p10-17, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
31442
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A working mother fights to give her kids a better life in Charlotte where the odds of climbing out of poverty are lower than any other large city in the country.
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Record #:
36298
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Contentions between America’s political parties arise from misunderstandings as much as differences of opinion, according to the author. Clearing up some misunderstandings is Hood’s analysis of how the first amendment, tax cuts, war on poverty, and fight to improve education impact American society.
Record #:
36458
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Opening a door for a better future was OpenDoors of Asheville. Connecting at-risk children with customized educational and enrichment opportunities, the nonprofit organization offered tutoring, sporting events, and music and art lessons. Such activities can nurture talents overlooked by an educational system focusing on prospective behavioral problems and disciplinary issues.
Record #:
16781
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It is estimated that between 700,000 and one million state citizens live below the poverty line. Economic recession and repeal of policy that aids the impoverished has increased hardship on individuals and those organizations who attempt to help (NC Justice Center, AARP, the Institute for Civic Engagement and Social Change at N.C. Central, etc.). Examples of those living in dire conditions include Afghanistan and Iraqi veterans living under a bridge in Fayetteville.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 20, May 2012, p5, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13938
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In the 1960s, President Johnson declared war on poverty in the country. In North Carolina the poverty level has dropped from a high of 40 percent in the late 1950s to slightly over 16 percent in 2009. However, the same facts show different truths about what it is to be poor in the state.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 28 Issue 13, Mar 2011, p5, 9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
583
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Poverty is costing the state of North Carolina in areas beyond the fiscal.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Mar 1991, p12-14, il
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Record #:
315
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Liner examines the problem of tax inequity for the poor and offers suggestions for correcting it.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 11 Issue 2-3, Apr 1989, p138-152, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
319
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The author introduces three North Carolina families living in poverty in three separate regions of the state.
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Record #:
15819
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During the 20th-century, governors of North Carolina used different economic theories to justify public policy for recruiting outside capital for manufacturing plants to the state in order to alleviate unemployment and poverty social problems. The author argues this economic theory explains North Carolina's persistent low wages.
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Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 5 Issue 2, Fall 1979, p14-21, f
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Record #:
17907
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To deal with the complexities of new community engagement task forces, the Institute of Government designed a training course to equip members of the new Community Action Agencies. These agencies carried out new initiatives to end the \"war on poverty.\" Program organizers hoped the 41 newly trained executives would alleviate local governments of the responsibility of enacting these new initiatives.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 33 Issue 2, Oct 1966, p17-19, por
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Record #:
17703
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The North Carolina Fund refers to an initiative to lift state citizens out of poverty. The non-profit group, organized by Governor Sanford, functioned outside of government seeking financial backing from investors like Henry Ford. Committee men of the group decided to adequately disperse funds across the state, each community would draw up an individual proposal for their distinct area to solve distinct problems of poverty.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 30 Issue 9, June 1964, p2-8, il
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