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4 results for Planetariums--Chapel Hill
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Record #:
8624
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Abstract:
Industrialist John Motley Morehead wanted to do something special and educational for North Carolina children. In 1949, he gave the state the Morehead Planetarium in Chapel Hill. At the planetarium, celestial recognition and stellar navigation training was given to all of the American astronauts in the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and Apollo-Soyuz missions. In 1969, during its installation, Neil Armstrong inaugurated the planetarium's projector, the Zeiss Model VI Projector, which is used for indoor stargazing. In 1974, NASA struck a commemorative medal marking the planetarium's significance in space research. The medal features both the planetarium's building and its Zeiss projector.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 10, Mar 1983, p24, il
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Record #:
12147
Author(s):
Abstract:
Visited by more than 725,000 North Carolinians, the Morehead Planetarium at UNC Chapel Hill is the sixth installation of its type in the Western Hemisphere. \r\n
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 24 Issue 14, Dec 1956, p10-11, 35-36, il
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Record #:
18480
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Until 1975, every American astronaut, including Alan Shepard, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and John Glenn, received training at the Morehead Planetarium on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. There they learned celestial navigation, which was essential should their onboard navigation system fail. Anthony Jenzano, the planetarium's director, was their instructor.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 8, Jan 2013, p39-40, 42-43, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16055
Abstract:
The state was actively involved with sending the first astronauts to the moon. Astronauts were trained in understanding the celestial environment at the Morehead Planetarium in Chapel Hill under the guidance of director A. F. Jenzano. Two of those astronauts were also native North Carolinians; Major Charles Moss Duke, Jr. and Dr. William Edgar Thornton.
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