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6 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Flags
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Record #:
2784
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Abstract:
The 2nd Battalion, North Carolina Infantry's flag, captured by the 27th Massachusetts Regiment during the battle of Roanoke Island on February 8, 1862, was returned by Massachusetts on November 29, 1988.
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Record #:
12324
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Abstract:
The first flag of the Confederate States of America was designed by Major Orren Randolph Smith and constructed by Miss Catherine Rebecca Murphy with her aunt and Miss Nora Sykes assisting. The flag first flew on the Franklin County Court House Square in Louisburg. This marked the turning point of public opinion from apathy to pro-secessionist-Confederacy.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Aug 1974, p7-10, 41, il, por
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Record #:
14545
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Abstract:
It took a lot research to determine who designed the Bonnie Blue Flag, but in the end full credit was given to Major Orren Randolph Smith.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 26, Nov 1945, p11, 27
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Record #:
15676
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Abstract:
In part two of Gerard's eight-part series on the Civil War, he writes pre-Civil War spirits amongst the state's volunteer army were as brazen as the newly stitched uniforms and flags worn and carried by so many young North Carolinians. Unfortunately for these men, their finery outmatched weaponry; most troops armed with the family's hunting rifle or state provided surplus rifles from the Revolutionary War. Their attitudes were born from a sense of righteous cause and \"no cultural memory of defeat.\"
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 1, June 2011, p66-70, 72, 74-75, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24638
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Ansonville, North Carolina in 1861, a group of men in the town contrived a flag for the state, hoping it would convince others to secede from the Union. Many villagers were unhappy with the flag and the town witnessed multiple acts of the removal and rehanging of the flag.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 18, February 1959, p15-16, 22
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Record #:
14359
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's Civil War soldiers carried and fought under four different kinds of flags: state, company, national, and battle flags. After the hostilities ended, many of these were brought home, while others had been captured and taken home by Northern states or the Federal Government. Many of these have now been returned. The Museum of History in Raleigh has the largest collection of Confederate flags held by any state-operated museum in the South.
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