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7 results for Maps, Early--North Carolina
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Record #:
20828
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This article describes the history of the first fully-realized map of North Carolina created by surveyors Jonathan Price and John Strother. Work began in 1792 with petitions to the state for project funding but the work and printed copies of the map were not available until 1806. The author discusses the difficulties of financing the project, general histories of the surveyors involved, and the finished product including inaccuracies.
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Record #:
21597
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A look at the work of surveyors and cartographers Jonathan Price, John Strother, and Joshua Potts. Price and Strother published the first actual survey and map of North Carolina in 1798, and Potts' first map came in 1801. All three significantly advanced the cartography of the state during their careers and their work formed the basis for subsequent maps and plans for fortification of Wilmington and the Cape Fear River.
Record #:
19032
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North Carolina has been mapped from the documentation of America to the present. Tryon Palace houses an important collection of maps recording the Carolinas and the Colonial history of the state.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 7 Issue 3, Spring 2007, p6-7, f
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Record #:
19034
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Richards recounts the 18th-century mapping of North Carolina, detailed in the historic maps housed at Tryon Palace.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Summer 2007, p4-7, bibl, f
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Record #:
28546
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Edward Moseley and the famous Moseley Map are profiled. Moseley was the surveyor general of North Carolina and created his map to correct the mistakes in John Lawson’s 1709 map. The only copy of the map in the United States is owned by East Carolina University and its history and appearance are described.
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Record #:
30908
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A map found by an Department of Archives and History assistant archaeologist, while researching a project site, led to the discovery of two undocumented Civil War gun emplacements. These Emplacements, part on the earthworks created to protect the Old Georgetown Road, were excavated and recorded prior to their destruction in order to create a discharge canal for the newly constructed nuclear power plant.
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