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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Local government
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Record #:
2367
Abstract:
In order to improve service quality, local governmental agencies need a systematic method to determine the quality of service citizens expect or feel they are currently receiving. A Lincoln County survey shows promise.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 60 Issue 4, Spring 1995, p26-33, il, f
Record #:
2565
Abstract:
Now that local governments statewide can gain access to the Internet through a service provider under state contract, a wide range of government resources is available.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 61 Issue 1, Summer 1995, p43-45, il
Record #:
2867
Author(s):
Abstract:
While citizens demand more services, like new roads and additional police, they resist higher taxes to pay for them. This forces local governments to try to do more with less and to choose between programs to fund.
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Full Text:
Record #:
2922
Abstract:
Determining which Web sites contain useful information is important to users. Evaluative criteria, including content, material organization, Web site overview, statement, time-sensitive data, and graphics will assist users.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 61 Issue 4, Summer 1996, p41-48
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Record #:
3075
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Institute of Government at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides assistance to state and local governments through teaching over 200 specialized courses, writing books and monographs, and consulting.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 62 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p2-15, il
Record #:
3092
Abstract:
Contracting services formerly done by governments, like garbage collecting, has the potential to save funds and increase accountability and efficiency. However, governments must insure that contracting does not affect public health, safety, and welfare.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 62 Issue 2, Winter 1997, p2-11, il, f
Record #:
3117
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Association of County Commissioners presents a united voice for the state's 100 counties in dealing with such groups as the General Assembly. The association communicates with members through publications and an internet home page.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 62 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p22-25, il
Record #:
3118
Abstract:
The N.C. League of Municipalities represents members' interests in dealing with state and federal lawmakers and regulatory agencies. It also provides services, including research consulting; publications, like SOUTHERN CITY; and legal assistance.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 62 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p26-29, il
Record #:
3116
Abstract:
The sixteen-campus University of North Carolina system offers a variety of resources and services to local governments, including East Carolina University's Center for Applied Technology, Regional Development Institute, and Survey Research Laboratory.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 62 Issue 1, Fall 1996, p16-21, il
Record #:
3195
Abstract:
Legislative issues that are of importance to municipalities in the 1997 General Assembly include the local sales tax on food, annexation, open meetings, and public transportation.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 47 Issue 1, Jan 1997, p1,8, il
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Record #:
3625
Author(s):
Abstract:
With federal funding for low-rent housing decreasing, local governments have become more active in seeking ways to provide affordable housing to qualifying individuals. Programs in Burlington, Greensboro, and Holly Springs are profiled.
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Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 48 Issue 1, Jan 1998, p1,7-8, il
Record #:
8931
Author(s):
Abstract:
The child care industry generates $7.5 billion in North Carolina. In addition to preparing children for school, the industry creates jobs, purchases goods and services, generates tax revenues, and supports the employment of working families. Douglass gives examples of how local governments support child care around the country and in North Carolina and describes innovative approaches local governments can use to develop resources and strengthen the child care industry in their communities.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 72 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p4-14, il, f
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Record #:
10759
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cleveland County and Kings Mountain have created the Cleveland Association of Governmental Officials, a new county agency to help the two work together. CAGO oversees water, sewer, and building regulations. The overall intent of the program is to consolidate the school, police, welfare, health, library and fire departments into CAGO.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 18, Feb 1967, p13, il
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Record #:
18213
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Councils of Government was an organization promoting local government through a federally backed program. These councils consisted of locally elected officials organized into two categories; those groups meeting regularly for discussions and the others in charge of enacting changes proposed during the meetings of the first group. In the spring of 1969, these groups were surveyed and feedback from the Institute of Government's inquiries is presented in this article.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 35 Issue 9, June 1969, p14-18
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Record #:
28939
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three government entities that provide state assistance to local governments are the North Carolina Local Government Commission, the Institute of Government, and the Local Government Advocacy Council. These entities were established for comprehensive, state-supervised oversight of local government finances, research and support for policy decisions, and formation of partnerships between state and local government.
Source:
NC Insight (NoCar JK 4101 .N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p6-9, f