NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


16 results for Ku Klux Klan
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
3700
Author(s):
Abstract:
Long-buried state documents, including field notes, transcripts, surveillance reports, and registers of members, reveal Ku Klux Klan activities during the 1960s. Over one hundred groups, with about 7,000 official members, existed statewide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 15, Mar 1997, p11-15, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
7716
Author(s):
Abstract:
On November 3, 1979, the Communist Workers Party held a “Death to the Klan” rally in Greensboro. A clash with the Ku Klux Klan resulted, leaving five CWP members shot dead in the streets and several wounded. Several Klansmen and Nazi party members were charged with murder, but were acquitted in both state and federal courts. Recently activist groups in Greensboro set up a Truth and Reconciliation tribunal to revisit the event and issue a report in April 2006.
Source:
Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Feb 2006, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
15067
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Ku Klux Klan reached North Carolina in 1867 -- the first organization established in Salisbury and was held in the law offices of Kerr Craige. From that point it spread through the state until it included some 40,000 members.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 24, Nov 1940, p5-6, 16, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
15268
Author(s):
Abstract:
Republican politician and lawyer John W. Stephens was murdered by the Ku Klux Klan. Stephens served as a Confederate soldier but after the war became an advocate for the newly freed slaves. His allegiance caused the KKK to murder him in the Caswell County courthouse. This incident foreshadowed the Kirk-Holden war, a struggle between KKK and Governor William Holden in 1870 over the KKK's suppression of freed slave voting.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 43, Mar 1939, p9, 19, 24
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
15271
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Invisible Empire is a euphemism for the Ku Klux Klan. Following the Civil War the KKK was rooted both in the Piedmont and western portion of the state. In the east the focal counties were Alamance, Caswell, and Orange and western counties were Cleveland and Rutherford. KKK actions became so disruptive that Governor William W. Holden declared these counties under a state of insurrection and sent Colonel George W. Kirk with troops in 1870, an incident known better as the Kirk-Holden war.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 47, Apr 1939, p5, 20
Full Text:
Record #:
17456
Abstract:
Accompanied by much fanfare, various officers of the Ku Klux Klan announced last December that North Carolina would become a stronghold of that organization during the coming months. Ordinances were set by many cities such as Charlotte and Raleigh to denunciate the movement and force members into the open.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
17489
Abstract:
The Raleigh City Council, which last December passed an anti-mask ordinance, aimed a further blow at Klan activity last month by adopting an ordinance which prohibits: burning of crosses in public places, cross burning on property without permission of the owner; any exhibit intended to intimidate any person, or the display of a burning cross in any parade within the city.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
20565
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article looks at the post-Civil War Ku Klux Klan organization in North Carolina. The author offers a revisionist account of Klan activities between 1869 and 1870 specifically in the Piedmont area where the Klan was more concentrated and organized. Rather than previous assessments of the Klan as an organization which restored order in a time of chaos, the author looks at the terroristic aspect of Klan activities and the organization's impact on political affairs.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
21193
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the 1928 editorials of 'Cleveland Press' editor W.J. Cash during the Al Smith-Herbert Hoover presidential campaign. In his editorials, Cash criticized the anti-Catholic sentiment in Shelby, North Carolina. In doing so, Cash angered the Ku Klux Klan and was targeted by them through KKK literature.
Subject(s):
Record #:
21308
Abstract:
An examination of civil governor William Woods Holden's utilization of the state's detective unit - a forerunner to the State Bureau of Investigation - to describe the role that secret agents played during the Reconstruction era in North Carolina. Particular attention is given to Holden's use of the agents in an effort to halt the spread of Ku Klux Klan violence and to thwart the plans of the clan to halt Republican political power and reestablish conservative rule in the state.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
21833
Author(s):
Abstract:
A look at the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) in western North Carolina and their objection the activities of federal revenue agents with regard to taxation of whiskey and the destruction of illegal \"moonshine\" stills. The KKK was able to secure considerable local support on this issue during the late 19th century as they targeted federal government agents at work in the region.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
21871
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines the 29 September 1885 lynching of three black men and one black woman in Chatham County, a stronghold of Ku Klux Klan influence. A mob of 100 whites murdered the victims, who were accused in two unrelated murder cases.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 75 Issue 2, Apr 1998, p135-160 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
23265
Author(s):
Abstract:
Geary argues that the Tea Party is similar to the KKK because both seek to protect their way of life from liberal forces.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
25584
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the longest criminal civil-rights trial in U.S. history, nine Klan-Nazi defendants were acquitted on charges stemming from the 1979 anti-Klan rally in Greensboro. There are four contributing factors that led to the not-guilty verdicts including a conservative interpretation of the federal civil-rights statues, the defense casted the victims as revolutionaries, jury selection did not reflect a cross-section of the community, and defense and prosecution contrasted in experience and style.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 8, April 27-May 10 1984, p3, il Periodical Website
Record #:
22020
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mrs. Mary Woodson Jarvis', wife of Governor Thomas Jarvis, thoughts on the political and social conditions in the United States that led to the development of Ku Klux Clan.
Subject(s):
Full Text: