NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


3 results for Jonkonnu (Festival)
Currently viewing results 1 - 3
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
5021
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the slave period until 1898, African Americans in Eastern North Carolina observed a Christmastime custom called Jonkonnu. The practice originated in Jamaica and spread to North Carolina, which was the only state where it was observed. Jonkonnu is a unique blend of West African and English customs. In 2000, the Christmas tradition was revived during New Bern's annual Holiday Candlelight Tours.
Source:
Record #:
8596
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the 19th-century, Wilmington and other coastal towns in North Carolina claimed one of the most unusual ways of celebrating Christmas. The celebration mixed Halloween and Christmas traditions and involved groups of eight to ten slaves who paraded through their communities in grotesque costumes on Christmas morning, singing, chanting, and dancing. They were called “Kooners” or the “John Kooners.” The custom was unheard of in other parts of the country. The parades were performed between the 1850s and the 1880s and always ended with the passing of a hat for donations.
Source:
Record #:
24745
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jonkonnu Celebrations—celebrations performed byAfrican slaves during the nineteenth century--occurred almost solely in North Carolina. Today Tryon Palace continues this tradition of dancing and singing twice each December.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 7, December 2015, p32, 34-35, il, por, map Periodical Website
Full Text: