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Record #:
34398
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biologist Susan Campbell has been banding and studying ruby-throated hummingbirds in North Carolina for over twenty years. Her research has shown that these hummingbirds usually return to the same location every spring. More and more hummingbirds have been found overwintering along the coast, especially in the Outer Banks, due to warmer climate and plentiful food.
Record #:
7489
Author(s):
Abstract:
The ruby-throated hummingbird is the most familiar of the species to North Carolinians. It is the only hummingbird that breeds east of the Mississippi River. Over the past decade a dozen other kinds of hummingbirds have been seen in North Carolina and in an unusual season--winter. What is not clear is whether the winter ranges of some hummingbirds are expanding or whether the birds have always been here in winter and not been noticed. The rufous hummingbird is the most abundant of the winter sightings. Pusser discusses the research on winter hummingbirds by bird biologist Susan Campbell, who is the only North Carolinian with a permit to band hummingbirds.
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Record #:
8588
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hummingbirds are magnificent creatures. They are the only birds that can hover and instantly switch to any direction. In order to fuel their amazing flights, hummingbirds eat half their weight a day in sugar. This would be the equivalent of a 170-pound man eating and burning 150,000 calories a day. Ruby-throated hummingbirds, the most common hummingbird in North Carolina, spend their winters in Central American and in southern Mexico. They make a 2,000-mile journey across the Gulf of Mexico to spend their summers in the southeastern United States. The author fell in love with hummingbirds when he placed a feeder in his yard. Since then, the author has enjoyed observing hummingbirds and their behaviors, such as fighting over rights to the feeder.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Sept 1983, p23-24, por
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