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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Ginseng
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Record #:
17839
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Deep in the Southern Appalachians in the rich earth of states like North Carolina, American ginseng grows.
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Record #:
4693
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Ginseng is an endangered plant that has medicinal properties highly prized by illegal harvesters. To help the North Carolina Department of Agriculture catch ginseng poachers, researchers developed a harmless dye to spray on the plant. The secret dye identifies an illegal harvest. Since 1993, eighty ginseng poachers have been convicted. Stealing an endangered plant is a felony.
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Record #:
5951
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Ginseng, an endangered plant that has medicinal properties, is highly prized by plant poachers. The dried roots sell from $270 to $600 a pound. Stealing an endangered plant is also a felony, but that hasn't stopped poachers from targeting growing areas near the Blue Ridge Parkway and in the Great Smokies. Nickens discusses the work of North Carolina Department of Agriculture agents in combating plant theft.
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Record #:
29910
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The activity of sanging or digging ginseng was also one of the most profitable pastimes for Western North Carolina families. The hardwood forests of the Appalachian Mountains were the ideal environment for this hardy perennial. Through most of the nineteenth century, ginseng was an important source of money for subsistence farmers, and tons of ginseng were shipped annually to Asia where it was highly valued for its medicinal properties.
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