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14 results for Gaston County--Economic conditions
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Record #:
1807
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gaston County has transformed itself from a textile manufacturing offshoot of Charlotte to a diversified hub of high-technology manufacturing, service, and retailing.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Aug 1994, p25-31, 34-35, il
Record #:
4409
Author(s):
Abstract:
Buckeye Technologies, Inc., attracted by $11.5 million in state and local incentives, will build a $100 million fibers plant in Gaston County. Completion date is 2001, and the new plant will employ over 200.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 12, Dec 1999, p9-10, il
Record #:
9495
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gaston County is profiled in this special community focus supplement. Among the topics discussed are economic development; the towns of Gastonia, Belmont, McAdenville, and Mount Holly; industrial base; and attractions like Crowder's Mountain, Schiele Museum, and the U.S. National Whitewater Center.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 9, Sept 2007, pp-5-42, il
Record #:
13335
Author(s):
Abstract:
Settled by the Scotch-Irish during the mid-18th-century and located in the southern piedmont region of the state, Gaston County is best known for industry. Gaston ranks 6th in the state for population, with 110,836 people in 358 square miles of land.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 18, Jan 1955, p18-30, il, map
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Record #:
13336
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gaston County, formed in 1846, was named for William Gaston (1778-1844), a member of Congress and a judge on the North Carolina Supreme Court. Pleasants provides brief historical summaries on the towns comprising Gaston County: Bessemer City, Belmont, Mount Holly, Cherryville, Dallas, Stanley, Cramerton, East Gastonia, Lowell, McAdenville, High Shoals, Lucia, Crowder, Dellview, and Ranlo.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 18, Jan 1955, p31-41, il
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Record #:
16017
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gaston County is featured in The State magazine's community profile. Among the topics are the textile industry, the River Bend Power Plant owned by the Duke Power Plant, and the cities of Mount Holly, Cherryville, Lowell, Bessemer City, and Belmont.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 13, Aug 1936, p17-24, il
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Record #:
24147
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gaston County is close to Charlotte and provides affordability and recreational activities, making it an ideal and attractive destination for businesses.
Record #:
24667
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gaston County built an industrial empire using the nearby Catawba River; Duke’s development of the river is said to be the most thorough of any stream in the country. This article discusses the history of development and growth in Gaston County.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 18, January 1955, p18-30, il
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Record #:
24668
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author introduces various cities and towns in Gaston County, detailing their industries and the development in each.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 18, January 1955, p31-41, il
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Record #:
24727
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses the development of Gastonia and Gaston County, highlighting things of interest in each place.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 39, February 1949, p4-5, 20, il
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Record #:
28608
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gaston County its businesses, its tourism, and its residents are profiled. The county has been recognized in the past for its manufacturing and is the tenth most populous in the state.
Record #:
29552
Author(s):
Abstract:
When it comes to economic development in Gaston County, North Carolina, municipality leadership and public and private sector organizations form a unique bond that enhances business. Small-town community feel with metropolitan amenities make Gaston County a prime area for development.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 9, Sept-Sup 2007, p6-10, por