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7 results for Forest products industry
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Record #:
3135
Author(s):
Abstract:
With federal and state funds declining, forestry schools look to the timber industry for financial support. Critics of this funding question whether this gives the industry too much influence over the schools.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 15 Issue 1, Jan 1997, p7-9, il Periodical Website
Record #:
12716
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has approximately five hundred wood-processing industries across the state. These include sawmills, plywood or veneer plants, and pulp mills. The Piedmont has the most with 198 industries. The products produced are used by other state industries; for example, North Carolina leads the nation in the production of wooden household furniture.
Source:
Record #:
26837
Author(s):
Abstract:
A 40th Anniversary National Tree Farm Dedication ceremony was held on the T.O. Perry Tree Farm near Durham on June 12, 1981. The ceremony was attended by Governor James B. Hunt, Andy Griffith, and other prominent individuals in the forest products and tree farming business.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 8, Aug 1981, p5, il, por
Record #:
28333
Abstract:
Demand for value-added forest products and an abundance of unused small-diameter timber have created interest in structural uses for small-diameter timber. This study examined indicators of small-diameter loblolly pine tree taper in the Duke Forest on the North Carolina Piedmont, so that managers can more easily evaluate the potential for applications.
Record #:
31564
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than two-thirds of North Carolina is covered by forests, but the state could face a severe timber shortage in less than twenty-five years because of a lack of forest maintenance. There are issues with small landowners, who own almost eight-percent of the state’s commercial timberland. Quality trees are cut for sale but are not replanted after harvesting, leading to under stocked, deteriorating timberland.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 5, May 1978, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31565
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wood could become an important energy source for North Carolina’s industrial firms, farmers and even homeowners. Forestry experts estimate that unutilized tree material and wood residue could provide at least one-hundred-million tons of wood fuel each year. Wood can be made into fuel pellets which would burn better than raw fuels.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 5, May 1978, p10, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31983
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kamlar Corporation, a company headquartered in Winston-Salem and with production facilities near Pantego, has found an important use for pine bark in mulching and decorative landscaping. Kamlar takes the bark, ages it a few months, screens it into varied sizes, and then bags it for shipment. This is an alternative to piling and burning the bark, further polluting the air and rendering the land unuseful.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Jan 1971, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website