NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


18 results for Fishes--Geographical distribution
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
6014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some fish, like the largemouth bass, are found in streams throughout the state. Others, like the Carolina madton, have a limited range because of geographical barriers or other factors. These latter fish are called endemic, and there are five species in the state: Carolina madton, Cape Fear Shiner, Waccamaw darter, Waccamaw killifish, and Waccamaw silverside.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28387
Author(s):
Abstract:
Snipe eels and lancetfishes are bathy and mesopelagic fishes with wide, yet poorly known Atlantic and Pacific Ocean distributions. New information is presented on the distribution of these species off North Carolina.
Record #:
28394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Basking sharks and whale sharks are two of the largest sharks in the world. Observations of these two sharks confirm that they are members of the North Carolinian fish fauna.
Record #:
28167
Author(s):
Abstract:
A large bulleye, Cookeolus japonicas (Family Priacanthidae), was caught March 2, 2001, by a commercial hook-and-line fisherman, southwest of Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina. This new North Carolina specimen is the largest in North Carolina and the second largest reported in the Northwest Atlantic.
Record #:
28203
Abstract:
Seven species of batfishes were collected between 1968 and 2002 at shallow to deep water Atlantic Ocean stations located from North Carolina to Florida. New information reveals extended distributions of the batfishes, and biological characteristics that can be used to distinguish between batfishes.
Record #:
28213
Abstract:
This study examined the distribution localities, sizes, and depths frequented by red cornetfish and bluespotted cornetfish collected between 1958 and 2003 off North and South Carolina. Their recent status in sound and ocean waters was compared to earlier observations and distributions.
Record #:
28233
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biological features of five species of carangid fishes (African pompano, Atlantic bumper, rainbow runner, leatherjack, and cottonmouth jack) were examined. Abundance and presence of all five species in ocean or inland waters of North Carolina were influenced by habitat or water conditions.
Record #:
28243
Author(s):
Abstract:
The distributions and size status are reviewed of one Labrid, four Ostraciid, and five Diodontid fishes in North Carolina. The majority of the fishes examined were occasional or rare members of the North Carolina fish fauna. Overall abundances and occurrences remain unresolved.
Record #:
28265
Author(s):
Abstract:
Distributions, abundances and sizes are documented for species of searobins (family Triglidae) and armoured searobins (family Peristediidae) captured in inshore and offshore waters of North Carolina and adjacent areas. Observations show that the Cape Fear River estuary is a good nursery for these species, but fish distributions are being affected by warming and changing ecologies.
Record #:
28257
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Lakewood YMCA in southwest-central Durham is in danger of closing due to poor finances and infrastructure problems. Many in the community are upset because of center’s stabilizing place in the inner-city neighborhood and will take the next three months to try to solve the problem. The center is governed by Raleigh’s YMCA and many believe that the management does not understand the situation in Durham.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 24, June 2007, p5-6 Periodical Website
Record #:
28262
Author(s):
Abstract:
Distributions and sizes are presented for three species of soapfishes and one razorfish documented to occur in North Carolinian waters. Unexplained gaps exist between early and recent captures of soapfishes and razorfishes.
Record #:
28258
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bonefishes (family Albulidae) are cosmopolitan fishes that inhabit sand and grass flats of tropical seas. The current status of bonefishes in North Carolina was reviewed and a sixth bonefish species (Albula vulpes) was identified near Cape Hatteras.
Record #:
28328
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) typically range in oceanic waters along the entire Eastern Atlantic coast and in the northern Gulf of Mexico. However, there have been several reports of bluefin tuna in shallow depths of estuarine waters. Bluefin tuna were observed in Archers Creek located at the end of Bogue Banks, North Carolina.
Record #:
28338
Author(s):
Abstract:
Trawling in deep ocean waters off North Carolina and adjacent areas between August 1969 and September 1977 captured dories, snailfish, and lumpfish. All were smaller than known and represent southerly range extensions.
Record #:
30062
Author(s):
Abstract:
This study examined the distribution of ocean sunfish (Mola mola). More than sixty encounters with the ocean sunfish in North Carolina’s offshore waters reveal that this fish is an epipelagic migrant, occurring in shallow water commonly in the spring.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 12, Sept 1986, p75-84, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
Full Text: