NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


23 results for Farms
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
34277
Author(s):
Abstract:
Isaiah and Annie Louise Perkinson manage Flying Cloud Farm in Fairview, North Carolina. The farm is known for its fields of flowers, which are connected to Annie Louise’s family history in England and Germany. From July through October, visitors to the farm can pick their own bouquets of flowers.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p26-28, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
38204
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Charlotte couple traded an urban life for rural life in buying a farm, with the expected part of their pastoral plan involving animals like llamas and horses. The unexpected member of their animal menagerie was alpacas. This in turn yielded an unexpected result for their dream home: it became Good Karma Ranch. What the couple calls an “adult camp” currently specializes in agritourism, products made from alpaca fur, and BYOB gatherings. The expanded version of “adult camp” at Good Karma Ranch will soon include yoga and wine and paint nights.
Record #:
38244
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some veterans traumatized by their combat experience worked at the farm of Bill O’Brien, a who served in the Navy and Army National Guard. From the toil of the soil at Veteran Owned Veteran Grown Inc. came their healing of mind and spirit.
Record #:
28490
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mount View Farm near Chapel Hill, NC has been a part of the Neville family since 1756. The history this farm and several other Bicentennial and Century Farms across North Carolina are detailed. Family members discuss the importance of the farms to their families and their identities.
Source:
Record #:
29050
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reorganization of the United States Department of Agriculture may have significant impacts to North Carolina farms and rural communities. The proposal combines USDA divisions in charge of farm subsidies and land stewardship, areas in which the department interacts directly with farmers. Reorganization would also eliminate the undersecretary for rural development, which worries small farm advocates.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 20, May 2017, p15-16, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
29838
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frances Tacy and her family have run Franny’s Farm in Leicester, North Carolina for five years. The farm raises animals for breeding and meat consumption, as well as to teach farm skills and animal care to children in the farm’s summer camp programs. New to the farm’s educational opportunities is a primitive skills camp for young girls.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
29853
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deepening connections to customers is important to Nicole DelCogliano and Gaelan Corozine, who own Green Toe Ground Farm in Celo, North Carolina. The couple hosts annual field-to-fork dinners at their farm, where the biodynamic farmers serve what they grow. The dinners help to strengthen people’s understanding of farming and what it takes to grow food.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
36202
Author(s):
Abstract:
John Tradescant the Younger is credited for finding plants such as the Virginia Creeper and Spiderwort, with the latter having his contribution reflected in its Latin name, Tradescantia virginiana. Along with being a popular garden plant, Spiderwort can be found in abandoned farms and homesteads, a testament to their former importance in agrarian life.
Source:
Record #:
27179
Abstract:
Jilian and Ross Mickens are rebuilding an abandoned farm called Open Door Farm in Orange County. They aim to teach people the value and practice of sustainable farming. Their effort is part of a larger process of adding youth back into agriculture, an increasingly lost profession.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 22, June 2016, p19-20, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
35422
Author(s):
Abstract:
To help farmers deter the increasing nationwide incidences of vandalism and theft, Patrick Fiel drew from his thirty plus years of work experience in this article that offers advice for the fields for safety and security.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
24137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Michael Jones used to manage factory hog farms but turned to smaller farming methods that humanely raise hogs that taste better and are hormone free.
Record #:
30810
Author(s):
Abstract:
Caraway Alpacas is one of the fifty-five North Carolina member farms on the Carolina Alpaca Breeders and Owners list. These farms are registered to own and breed alpacas, known for their luxurious fibers and fleece. The owners of Caraway Alpacas, near Asheboro, discuss the history and process of raising alpacas in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Sept 2010, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
30863
Author(s):
Abstract:
Acre Station Meat Farm specializes as a butcher for hog and beef farmers who raise animals without steroids or antibiotics. By working with local farmers to create the custom meat cuts and unique value-added products that bring them business, Acre Station is helping to rebuild North Carolina’s local food economy.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 8, Aug 2009, p26-27, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
31180
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cas Booe grows, processes, and sells his Yadkin Valley Popcorn at Shallowford Farms, a family owned and operated agribusiness located outside of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Also known as the Popcorn King, Booe’s popcorn comes in a variety of flavors and forms, and has won national awards. In this article, Booe discusses his background, daily farming operations, marketing, and tours offered on the farm.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 12, Dec 2003, p23-25, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
35758
Author(s):
Abstract:
The fourth annual symposium of the Southern Foodways Alliance continued the trend of valuing traditions associated with Southern cooking culture and the region’s farming industry. Discussed during this symposium was challenges that contemporary regional farmers face, due to the USDA’s implementing the corporate farm mentality. Also highlighted was challenges of maintaining Southern cooking cultural traditions, with an increasingly diverse and transient regional population.
Source: