NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


3 results for Falconry
Currently viewing results 1 - 3
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
8023
Author(s):
Abstract:
Falconry's partnership between raptor and hunter still yields the excitement that thrilled ancient hunters. Falconry has increased in popularity in the state over the last ten years. In North Carolina there are about fifty falconers who work with two different types of birds of prey--peregrine falcons and a variety of hawks. Falconers must obtain a falconry permit, an annual falconry license, and a state hunting license, all issued by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Falconers have organized the North Carolina Falconer's Guild.
Subject(s):
Record #:
24798
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two Durham filmmakers are currently producing a documentary called Overland. The documentary explores the modern state of falconry and traces the spread of the 6,000- year-old tradition, with filming taking place all over the world.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 4, January 2016, p31, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8103
Author(s):
Abstract:
Arrington discusses the history of falconry, one of the oldest sports which employs animals for sporting purposes. While falconry is still practiced in many places, its popularity has diminished. Few people have the time it takes to capture, tame, train, and hunt falcons. North Carolina games laws do not permit the taking of game birds or protected birds by means other than those listed in the hunting regulations. While falcons can be used within the state, they can be legally used only on unprotected species.
Subject(s):
Full Text: