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30 results for Edenton--History
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Record #:
22272
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Abstract:
This article reviews the program for the 1908 dedication of a memorial tablet commemorating the signers of the 1774 Edenton Tea Party Resolve. Also noted were the Tea Party descendants in attendance, dedication participants and selected speeches from the dedication ceremony.
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Record #:
22266
Abstract:
The unveiling of the Memorial to the Edenton Tea Party involved steps taken by both local and national organizations to raise funds for the erection of the monument.
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Record #:
22472
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In Edenton, North Carolina three distinct building types were completed in the early 1700s. One was the Cupola House, built by Francis Corbin who was appointed by John, Earl of Granville. The Cupola House was built in 1758 after several years of construction. The house faces the water and is filled with unique structural features that were maintained even as the property changed ownership over the years.
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Record #:
22484
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Edenton, also known during the Revolutionary War as the Port of Roanoke, was an important port city, and was thus a British target during the conflict. One such predator on the Albemarle Sound was the British row galley, GENERAL ARNOLD. Attacks on boats and encounters with GENERAL ARNOLD forced many to flee across the Sound to Windsor. However, the citizens of Edenton banded together to meet GENERAL ARNOLD head-on.
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Record #:
22658
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North Carolina's coastal region is home to a rich African-American history with locations that reflect the highs and lows for this group during and after slavery. For example, the Great Dismal Swamp became a place of refuge for those seeking freedom before and during the American Civil War as part of the Maritime Underground Railroad. Other places on this route, such as Wilmington, are known for their role in slavery, while James City is known as a place populated by freed blacks.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2015, p28-33, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35504
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NC's celebration of the US’ birthday wasn’t confined on ship. It also involved cruising by places on land that showcased NC’s contribution to America’s history. There were towns such as Edenton, Bath, and New Bern. It included dwellings like Orton Plantation, the Benjamin Wright House, and Tryon Palace. Also were landmarks such as the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Wright Brothers Memorial, and Blockade Runner Museum.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p8-10, 12-14
Record #:
35525
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Ragan examined an artistic expression array manifested on canvases literal and figurative. It was revealed in Edenton and Tryon Palace’s restorations. The State Library’s film service expansion and ECU’s summer drama program’s production of “The Lost Colony” displayed it. Poetry and prose were showcased in Atlantic Christian’s Crucible and ECU’s Poet-in-Residence program.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1973, p20-21, 40-43
Record #:
35579
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The historic trail of Eastern NC, covering towns such as Fayetteville and Windsor, was a road with plenty of landmarks. Contained for the tourists’ consideration were many of the state’s acre bound treasures—over two thirds, according to the author. Examples of these historic properties were Charles B. Aycock’s birthplace and the James Iredell House.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p30-31
Record #:
37220
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Article about the Hettrick Brothers from 1954. They came from Pennsylvania after the Civil War with Dutch nets to improve fishing, used the nets to kill blackbirds, had a sawmill, and had a bakery in Edenton, NC.
Record #:
36269
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The measurement of Edenton’s historical significance to North Carolina extends back the mid eighteenth century, when it was the state capital. The measure of its history extends to modern day, with the town’s efforts to preserve its Colonial roots. This is evident in facilities such as the courthouse, built in 1767, and historic houses such as the Barker House, built in 1783.
Record #:
37440
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Transcription of the letter and query on Joseph L. Whedbee (d. by 1850) and wife, Susan Wilson (b. 1785).
Record #:
37801
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Annotated transcription of a vessel bond, where he will not transport any servant or slave out of Edenton, nor depart without paying for pilotage.
Record #:
39264
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History of the Smallwood Family; Past and Present History of Aurora, NC; Facts About Bath, NC; List of other articles written by Robert Tripp Bonner that appeared in the Washington Progress.
Source:
Pamteco Tracings (NoCar F262.B37 P35), Vol. 14 Issue No. 1, June 1998, p45-49