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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Duck populations
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Record #:
10552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hunting for diving ducks in North Carolina's coastal regions has a rich history and a devoted following dating back to the 19th century. Despite an upward trend in the state, overall the population is declining. A definitive cause has yet to be found, but possible causes are habitat conditions on spring staging areas; contaminants; diseases; and hunting.
Full Text:
Record #:
24859
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Sylvan Height Avian Breeding Center breeds and raises the ducklings of many species. Their activities include rescue of foundlings as well as steps to ensure the survival of a more endangered species. The center located in Scotland Neck is open to visitation and attracts many interested visitors each year.
Source:
Record #:
26613
Author(s):
Abstract:
The total duck population counts are at their second lowest-level in recorded history. Reasons for their decline could be attributed to over-harvesting, but also to drought and habitat destruction. Consequently, new restrictions are imposed to duck hunting in North Carolina.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1988, p4-5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26636
Author(s):
Abstract:
Acid rain threatens the nation’s ducks by limiting the production of young ducks and destroying critical food organisms that are needed by egg-laying females and ducklings. The black duck, an eastern species, is particularly vulnerable because they exclusively breed in heavily impacted areas.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 4, July/Aug 1987, p8, il
Record #:
26879
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many people in the northwest region of Canada believe that an overpopulation of ducks threaten their future as farmers. In some years, Canadian farmers are besieged by hungry flocks that can cause extensive crop losses. Wildlife managers and farmers are working together to find a solution to the problem.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 1, Jan 1982, p11, il
Subject(s):