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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Curriculum and methods in education
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Record #:
14287
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scholastic standards in North Carolina were best exemplified in Miss Mark's kindergarten class. It was not only highly regarded within the state but also nationally regarded as one of the best programs for youngsters. The article discusses specifics of the program's curriculum including an emphasis on the book and audio library as well as instruments for the children to express their creativity.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 24, Nov 1948, p3-4, 18, il
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Record #:
19393
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cultural geography studies how humans live within their geographical locations. Typically this field incorporates ideas of cultural landscape, material culture, and architecture. The author proposes introducing students to this field by incorporating into curriculum a course in understanding the state's cultural geography.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 12 Issue , 2004, p43-56, il
Record #:
28907
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Arts Council is working with schools and community groups to connect art, science and the environment. Artists are also conducting workshops for teachers in rural areas to develop curriculum that incorporates hands-on arts and new methods of teaching.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Summer/Fall 1994, p1-3, por
Record #:
30564
Author(s):
Abstract:
With declining enrolment for history classes and changing curricular requirements with more focus toward social science, historians are concerned with the lack of emphasis on history in the public schools. The Joint Committee on the Status of History in the Public Schools suggest that history education should have a securely defined place in public school curriculum.
Record #:
36586
Author(s):
Abstract:
Touted as an advantage for homeschooling was developing a connection with nature by learning skills such as growing produce and animal husbandry. Reasons noted for homeschooling included children possessing gifts or challenges traditional schooling is unequipped to handle. While adhering to the state’s core curriculum and assessments, it utilizes teaching methods aligning with learning styles and interests and prioritize mastery over grades. Local support for homeschooled children includes Asheville Arboretum’s EXPLORE and Earthaven Ecovillage.
Record #:
36573
Author(s):
Abstract:
Newfound School’s curriculum, resulting in a majority of its graduates attending schools such as Yale and Oberlin, was partly inspired by the decade it existed. While complying with the state’s educational standards, the school founded in 1971 added real-world experience in novel ways. Included were courses such as oceanography; town hall-style to discuss current events; students exploring the city during free periods.
Record #:
36451
Author(s):
Abstract:
NetGen’s impact in education and communication can be felt in pedagogical methods and social media networks. The collaborative impact was illustrated in SkillPop, offering pop up classes teaching adults new skills. Highlighted in its profile was Haley Bohon’s inspiration for starting her business and its value for the worldwide community.
Record #:
38245
Author(s):
Abstract:
Universities across North Carolina have an eclectic approach when it comes to their degree programs. Recognizing the collective student body’s transformation in the past few decades, universities such as NC State and High Point University are trying to better meet their students’ needs. Examples include NC State’s MBA collaboratories, or half day workshops involving field experts and senior leaders, and High Point’s MBA courses, which are typically twenty minute lecture, two hour and forty minute group discussion and interaction.