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4 results for Christmas--History
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Record #:
8591
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Carter describes Christmas celebrations in North Carolina in the decades before the American Revolution. Christmas Day was considered a holy day, but the Christmas season, which ran from December 16 to January 6, was a time for social activities. The emphasis was on hunting, horse racing, games, courting, Christmas balls, family gatherings, and caroling. It was a season for leisure. Wassailing and burning the Yule log were traditions that early settlers brought from England, and mistletoe would have been one of the more popular decorations.
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Record #:
15436
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traditions and customs of the Old South, half-forgotten in the building of the new South, bob to the surface during the Christmas season. Firecrackers are common, Yule logs burn, and cowpeas and hog jowl are popular dishes. While the origin of these customs remains obscure, some trace them directly to the restricted life of early great plantations and poor communication facilities, which made them communities within themselves. Customs brought by the pioneer settlers of Europe were also preserved and altered to meet conditions of the area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 30, Dec 1936, p1, 22
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Record #:
31004
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Abstract:
On January 6, the village of Rodanthe in the Outer Banks of North Carolina celebrates Old Christmas. This is a tradition based on when the Gregorian calendar replaced the Julian calendar, changing the date of Christmas. Part of Rodanthe’s traditional festivities is a visit from Old Buck, a character based on the legend of an old wild bull that terrorized the village until a hunter got rid of him.
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Record #:
35467
Author(s):
Abstract:
Brought over from the Bahamas, the John Kuner celebration was held on or around Christmas. The celebration included costumes, songs, a performance, and dancing; the traditions was continuously practiced until the turn of the 20th century.