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10 results for Chickens
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Record #:
31096
Author(s):
Abstract:
An airborne virus known as LT (laryngotracheitis) can spread fast through chickens, causing breathing problems, underweight birds and death. The virus is not contagious to humans but can cause poultry farmers tremendous financial losses. Randolph Electric Membership Corporation took extra precautions when checking electric meters to prevent the disease from spreading in Asheboro, North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 36 Issue 8, Aug 2004, p24, il, por
Record #:
36559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite being labeled as organic and regarded as more profitable by large poultry producers, the author asserts slower growing chickens is the better breed. Benefits for standard bred heritage chickens: stronger skeletal structure, normal organ development, greater muscle mass and meat texture, and stronger immune systems. Benefits for farmers and consumers are genetic sustainability and better taste, respectively.
Record #:
22734
Abstract:
Several families in Fayetteville are raising chickens within the city limits.
Source:
CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , April 2012, p46-51, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31415
Author(s):
Abstract:
It is estimated that 100,000 laying hens will create an estimated $1.3 million worth of business annually. But with over 11 million laying hens in North Carolina, income from eggs, feed, electricity, and packaging is estimated to be over $140 million annually.
Subject(s):
Record #:
25585
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1982, Chicken sales grosses $422 million in North Carolina. But many of the state’s 2,200 growers reaped incomes that averaged less than the minimum wage. A the same time, state agricultural officials say the poultry industry is good for the state, which is now the nation’s fourth largest producer of broiler chickens.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 2 Issue 9, May 11-24 1984, p1, 6-7, il Periodical Website
Record #:
30975
Author(s):
Abstract:
Producing over 9 million chicks in November alone, North Carolina's commercial hatcheries held fourth place in the Nation. The total from January to November amounted to over 131 million.
Subject(s):
Record #:
37037
Author(s):
Abstract:
The thirty-one must-visit places are restaurants specializing in chicken—mild or spicy, served with waffles or on a bun. Included on this bucket list were Buxton Hall of Asheville, Mama Dip’s of Chapel Hill, and Spoon River Artworks and Market in Belhaven.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 11, April 2017, p132-136, 138, 140, 142-144, 146, 148 Periodical Website
Record #:
34386
Author(s):
Abstract:
Kay Evans and her husband Jim established the Chocowinity Chicken Sanctuary and Education Center in 2007 after rescuing a chicken from the highway. They have rescued chickens from abuse cases, overturned transport trucks, illness, laboratories, and abandonment in both the commercial broiler and egg industries. Evans is committed to caring for as many birds as possible and to spreading the word about the feasibility of providing a home to a chicken.
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Record #:
24424
Author(s):
Abstract:
In early 2015, the bird flu migrated from Asia to the United States, infecting birds in 15 states. In response to the potential arrival of the disease on the East Coast, The N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services passed a mandate requiring all poultry owners to register for an NCFarmID number, which the agency will use to track the spread of bird flu and warn owners of nearby threats to their birds. Many backyard chicken owners fear this regulation of their bird owning and what this means for their birds.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 42, October 2015, p10-11, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
28326
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chapel Hill is revisiting its town ordinances regulating the raising of chickens within its town limits. Urban chicken farming has increased in recent years as many people are aiming to get closer to their food and are fed up with the industrial food system. Many also keep flocks for health, environmental, humane, and educational reasons. Chapel Hill and Carrboro residents talk about the benefits of raising chickens and the problems they have faced trying to do so in city limits.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 44, October 2007, p23-25 Periodical Website