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35 results for Charlotte--History
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Record #:
24922
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The old Park Road Shopping Center in Charlotte is now under new ownership. Those who have been going there since it opened in 1956 are hoping it will keep its heart and character.
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Record #:
24943
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Part of a twelve part series, The Story of Charlotte: Part 3 talks about the gold rush in Charlotte starting in 1799. People from all over rush in to make their fortune in gold. Over the next decades, the rush accelerated until the recession in 1837.
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Record #:
24952
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Part four of a twelve part series describes the growth of Charlotte in the twenty years leading up to the Civil War. The building of a railroad connection to Charleston, South Carolina helped to stabilize the local economy after the gold rush ended in 1840. Fear of abolitionists and slaves escaping encouraged tensions before the war.
Record #:
24949
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Jeremy Markovich wonders what his grandchildren will think of his behavior. Considering the way his generation viewed the discrimination against blacks during the Civil Rights Movement, he wonders if there are despicable things this generation will have done in hindsight.
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Record #:
24964
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Life in Charlotte during the Civil War was a depressing and terrifying time. Between the number of wounded arriving and the fear of Sherman’s troops arriving, tensions were high as what originally seemed like certain victory eventually turned into an inevitable defeat. Part 5 of a 12 part series on the history of Charlotte.
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Record #:
24971
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In a landmark battle, Charlotte instituted busing students to achieve school desegregation. Follow the journey from the initial lawsuit about integration, through the courts and the “white flight” that ensued.
Record #:
24980
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Part 6 of a twelve part series on the history of Charlotte focuses on the Reconstruction. With the help of the Republican Party, blacks became active citizens. Some whites resisted this change, and political unrest ensues.
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Charlotte Magazine (NoCar F 264.C4), Vol. 19 Issue 10, October 2014, p37-38, 40, 42-45, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
24973
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Virginia Brown reviews what it was like to go to First Ward when busing was instituted in Charlotte. The long bus ride was difficult, but the exposure to people different from herself made the experience well worth the ride.
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Record #:
24984
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Wayne Jernigan has enjoyed a long career in the music recording industry. Everyone from James Brown or Tammy Faye Bakker has recorded at his studio.
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Record #:
24993
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Part seven of a twelve part series traces the history of Charlotte from beginning of the Jim Crow era through the Prohibition.
Record #:
6201
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Electric streetcars brought cities many advantages. They were the fastest form of city transportation for their time. They promoted the growth of suburbs, and they made the central business districts thriving markets for goods and jobs. In 1891, Charlotte businessman E. D. Latta, having observed the cars' use in other cities, determined to bring them to the city. Morrill recounts how Latta's idea developed.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 23 Issue 2, Winter 1984, p13-14, il, por
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Record #:
22721
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Whether through book or the collections at the Museum of the New South in Charlotte, North Carolina, Tom Hatchett interprets Charlotte's last 100 years as staff historian.
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Record #:
28875
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Charlotte Native and sportswriter Ron Green Jr. reflects on the grow3th of Charlotte as a sports town. Green discusses the lack of sports in the area when he was a child in the 1960s besides the occasional golf tournament which would come to town. Green discusses the city’s baseball team, the Charlotte Hornets, the Carolina Cougars of the American Basketball Association, Charlotte’s World Football League team that arrived in the 1970s, the Charlotte Motor Speedway, and the major sports events up to the present day. The history sports in Charlotte, the city’s atmosphere, and a timeline of major sporting events in the city are all detailed.
Record #:
30575
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Pam Howze lost her parents at a young age and moved across the country, only to return to Charlotte, and reconnected with an old friend who she eventually married. Nearly fifty years after losing her father, he was discovered in a photograph displayed at a charlotte trolley stop, by her husband.
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Record #:
30580
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Chief, the bull elephant of the John Robinson Circus, crushed his handler and wend on a rampage in the streets of Charlotte, NC. Plagued with bouts of testosterone driven madness, Chief was sent to live at Cincinnati Zoological Gardens. A decade later, chief killed two more trainers and was executed and served in a Cincinnati hotel restaurant.