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35 results for Charlotte--History
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Record #:
28875
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Charlotte Native and sportswriter Ron Green Jr. reflects on the grow3th of Charlotte as a sports town. Green discusses the lack of sports in the area when he was a child in the 1960s besides the occasional golf tournament which would come to town. Green discusses the city’s baseball team, the Charlotte Hornets, the Carolina Cougars of the American Basketball Association, Charlotte’s World Football League team that arrived in the 1970s, the Charlotte Motor Speedway, and the major sports events up to the present day. The history sports in Charlotte, the city’s atmosphere, and a timeline of major sporting events in the city are all detailed.
Record #:
30575
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Pam Howze lost her parents at a young age and moved across the country, only to return to Charlotte, and reconnected with an old friend who she eventually married. Nearly fifty years after losing her father, he was discovered in a photograph displayed at a charlotte trolley stop, by her husband.
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Record #:
30580
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Chief, the bull elephant of the John Robinson Circus, crushed his handler and wend on a rampage in the streets of Charlotte, NC. Plagued with bouts of testosterone driven madness, Chief was sent to live at Cincinnati Zoological Gardens. A decade later, chief killed two more trainers and was executed and served in a Cincinnati hotel restaurant.
Record #:
31334
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How can a person vanish? How can nobody know what happened? For a few families in the Charlotte region—including those of Denise Porch, Asha Degree, and Kyle Fleischmann—these are more than just hypothetical questions.
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Record #:
31438
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Five geographic icons of Charlotte’s past are highlighted in this article, the Barringer Hotel, the Ivey’s building, Suttle’s Swim Club, Thompson’s Bootery and Bloomery, and McDonalds Cefeteria.
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Record #:
31471
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Paul Booe was a beloved mixed martial arts trainer who taught hundreds of students how to fight their way out of difficult situations. But few people knew the battles being waged in his head, until one day, Mother’s Day 2015, he was gone.
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Record #:
22780
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Part 11 of the Story of Charlotte series, \"A Time of Unrest,\" covers the history of integration, racial unrest, urban renewal, and the passage of new liquor laws in Charlotte during the 1960s and 1970s. Points of racial contention mentioned include the Shrine Bowl, Swann v. Board of Education, and the midnight bombings of four civil rights leaders' homes in November of 1965. As the city began to expand, racial tension from urban renewal arose, and outlying neighborhoods fought unsuccessfully to avoid being engulfed by the growing metropolis.
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Record #:
24063
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Streetcars were an important part of North Carolina towns during the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. Originally, mules and horses pulled these cars, but in 1889, Asheville opened the first electric streetcar system in the state. Charlotte and Raleigh followed, and the streetcar allowed such cities to expand and establish suburban neighborhoods. By the 1930s, automobiles and buses replaced the streetcar, but today the system has been revived in the form of Charlotte's CityLYNX Gold Line, which runs three replica trolleys on a 1.5-mile track.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 5, October 2015, p43-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24124
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Charlotte's Hebrew Cemetery is a Jewish burial ground that is not only a place to revere the dead, but also provides insight into Jewish culture and Charlotte's history. Mayors, politicians, Confederate soldiers, and other important Charlotte residents are buried here.
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Record #:
23571
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Charlotte music venues have held an important place in the city's culture. This article outlines the evolving history of these venues.
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Record #:
23575
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Various authors recount the history of five of Charlotte's roads: Trade and Tryon, Queens Road West, Independence Boulevard, Wilkinson Boulevard, and Randolph Road. The stories of these roads highlight the history and evolution of the Queen City.
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Record #:
23574
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Author, Melissa Bashor, details the history of Eastland Mall--a mall located in Charlotte's east side--through her memories of the place.
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Record #:
24943
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Part of a twelve part series, The Story of Charlotte: Part 3 talks about the gold rush in Charlotte starting in 1799. People from all over rush in to make their fortune in gold. Over the next decades, the rush accelerated until the recession in 1837.
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Record #:
24952
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Part four of a twelve part series describes the growth of Charlotte in the twenty years leading up to the Civil War. The building of a railroad connection to Charleston, South Carolina helped to stabilize the local economy after the gold rush ended in 1840. Fear of abolitionists and slaves escaping encouraged tensions before the war.
Record #:
24949
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Jeremy Markovich wonders what his grandchildren will think of his behavior. Considering the way his generation viewed the discrimination against blacks during the Civil Rights Movement, he wonders if there are despicable things this generation will have done in hindsight.
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