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14 results for Chapel Hill--Description and travel
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Record #:
1328
Abstract:
Chapel Hill native William McCranor Henderson, a former screenwriter and the author of I KILLED HEMINGWAY and STARK RAVING ELVIS, takes a walk down memory lane upon his return to the homestead.
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North Carolina Home (NoCar NA 7235 N8 N32), Vol. 2 Issue 3, June 1993, p66-70, por
Record #:
9482
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Once a small, quaint university town, Chapel Hill, home of the University of North Carolina, has grown into a bustling city of 50,000. Sullivan describes the variety of cultural attractions, places to dine, and lively downtown section.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p228-230, 232, 234, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10853
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Chapel Hill has been known for its charm and beauty since 1795, when the town was selected as the home of the nation's first public university. Over the past two centuries the town has managed to escape the ravages of urban growth which has changed the look of so many American cities. Lea discusses the town's \"carefully preserved built environment.\"
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Record #:
10854
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Swanson presents an overview of Chapel Hill, discussing such issues as the town and gown relationship and the Franklin Street renewal project.
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Metro Magazine (NoCar F 264 R1 M48), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Feb 2009, p27-33, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15562
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Chapel Hill, located in Orange County, is OUR STATE Magazine's featured Tar Heel Town of the Month.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 6, Nov 2011, p40-44, 46, 48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22638
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Chapel Hill is the historic seat of the University of North Carolina, but it has much else to offer tourists and day trippers.
Record #:
2169
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The town of Chapel Hill grew up around well-preserved woods, now called Battle's Park, mainly because Kemp Battle, president of the University of North Carolina, loved and walked the tract over 130 years ago. The area was preserved in Battle's honor.
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Record #:
27958
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Abstract:
The controversial Greenbridge project has been built and Northside residents are now wondering what else will change in the Chapel Hill neighborhood. The project’s partners, neighbors, and area activists all believe the condominium complex symbolizes something different. The neighborhood was once considered an “enclave” for black residents. Now, many believe the complex will spur growth and economic development, but it may push out some of the neighborhoods traditional residents who cannot afford to keep living there.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 24, June 2010, p16-19 Periodical Website
Record #:
28024
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Chapel Hill has provided the town with a new map outlining potential downtown development. The new plan would establish much-needed parking, include a transit hub, increase the ease of walking, and include green areas. Some residents question whether the town can afford it and whether the residents will agree to tax increases to pay for it. There are some residents who oppose the plan believing the downtown is fine the way it is. The “Chapel Hill Syndrome” is disussed and the slow pace at which the city conducts business.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 40, October 2010, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28021
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Carrboro resident Daphne Athas’ discusses the myths surrounding Chapel Hill and Carrboro, as well as her personal history. The former University of North Carolina professor and author discusses her Greek heritage and religion, the famous authors and national celebrities she knew, and the culture of Chapel Hill and Carrboro. She recently published a collection of essays depicting portions of her life and her experiences living in the area.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 38, September 2010, p27 Periodical Website
Record #:
28453
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The public access channel in Chapel Hill is being severely neglected. Time Warner is partially at fault for the problem as they are ones who manage the channel. The equipment for producing and broadcasting programs is poor, few locally produced programs are broadcast, and the signal is poor. The fate of the station is uncertain as Chapel Hill and Time Warner are renegotiating the local cable contract and neither group wants to oversee the public access a channel.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 44, November 1994, p23 Periodical Website
Record #:
28455
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The drinking culture in Chapel Hill and the area’s changing tastes in beer are explored. Drinkers are now drinking more microbrewered, imported, and craft beers in Chapel Hill than in the past. This change in taste has affected bars and the way college students drink. The opening of Carolina Brewery and these new types of beers are detailed.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 12 Issue 45, November 1994, p22 Periodical Website
Record #:
28226
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Abstract:
Many parents of children with autism move to Chapel Hill for the high reputation and performance the Chapel Hill-Carrboro School District has. However, the district’s special education program is poor and this is surprising because of the district’s wealth and access to resources. Many parents blame the district for failing to educate their children and preventing parents from advocating on their behalf. School officials contend that many of these parents have unrealistic expectations and want a level of education the public schools are not legally required and cannot provide.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 10, March 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
28326
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Chapel Hill is revisiting its town ordinances regulating the raising of chickens within its town limits. Urban chicken farming has increased in recent years as many people are aiming to get closer to their food and are fed up with the industrial food system. Many also keep flocks for health, environmental, humane, and educational reasons. Chapel Hill and Carrboro residents talk about the benefits of raising chickens and the problems they have faced trying to do so in city limits.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 44, October 2007, p23-25 Periodical Website