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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Catfishes
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Record #:
34390
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North Carolina has five types of catfish including white, bullheads, blue, channel, and flatheads. In this article, the author discusses catfish fishing, catfish habitats, and catfish tournaments in North Carolina.
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Record #:
31047
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Several species of catfish (channel catfish, blue catfish, and flat heads) are found in ponds, lakes, watersheds, rivers and creeks throughout North Carolina. This article explains the biology and ecology of catfish, their habitat preferences, and feeding strategies. Also discussed are fishing techniques and typical locations to find catfish, which include Lake Phelps, Lake Sutton, Lake Mattamuskeet, and Lake Norman.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 39 Issue 8, Aug 2007, p22-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7490
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Kibler discusses catfishing, which is growing in popularity in North Carolina and across the country. The catfish is the biggest freshwater game fish in North American waters. In North Carolina the largest are the blue catfish, with a state record of eighty-five pounds, and the flathead catfish, with a state record of seventy-eight pounds. Tournaments devoted to catfishing offer thousands of dollars in prizes. Tackle companies have introduced equipment specifically for catfishing, and a number of how-to books on catching these big fish have been published.
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Record #:
5323
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The three largest members of the freshwater catfish family - channel, blue, and flathead catfish - live in the state's streams. In size, the blue is the largest, weighing up to 150 pounds, followed by the channel and flathead. Ashley describes and compares the catfish.
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Record #:
2077
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Long thought of as a mud-sucking scavenger of farm ponds and streams, the lowly catfish is becoming a mass-production business in North Carolina and across the South as the fish becomes an \"in\" delicacy on upscale menus.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 12, May 1994, p34-36, il
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Record #:
30143
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Species of ictalurid catfishes with an adnexed (free) adipose fin have presented identification problems, and consequently may subvert zoogeographic studies. This study examined new and preexisting records of catfishes in Virginia, North Carolina and other eastern states. Diagnostic characters are emphasized for distinguishing various species and their distribution.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 4, Dec 1980, p73-93, il, map, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
12257
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Dr. Garland Pardue of NCSU Zoology Department has researched fish-farming globally and is urging central and eastern North Carolina to adopt raising channel catfish as a lucrative means for generating revenue.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 10, Mar 1975, p25-26
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Record #:
8438
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Catfish farming is booming in the lower Mississippi River Valley, but how successful would it be in North Carolina? While people in the deep South consider catfish a delicacy, many North Carolinians consider the catfish a trash fish. The primary obstacles to catfish farming in the state are the unavailability of processing facilities and the lack of a steady market.
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Record #:
8179
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Catfish fall into two categories, freshwater and saltwater. In his article Raver discusses only freshwater catfish; examines misconceptions about catfish; and explains why anglers don't like this fish. The more abundant catfish in the state are the flathead, blue, channel, white, brown bullhead, and yellow bullhead. The flathead, native to a few western North Carolina river systems, is the largest, with a maximum weight of over one hundred pounds. The group of catfish known as madtoms are the smallest, with few species exceeding six inches.
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