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32 results for Budget
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Record #:
27608
Author(s):
Abstract:
State Deputy Budget Director, Art Pope, has resigned. A review of Pope’s impact on the state budget, voter suppression laws, education spending, judicial elections, and the restricting of the Rural Economic Development Center is conducted. Pope’s legacy is a negative one in the eyes of many North Carolinians.
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Record #:
27738
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Board of Governors is reviewing the UNC System’s centers and institutes and many could face deep funding cuts or be dismantled altogether. Critics argue that the process is not fair since most focus on issues facing minorities, women, and the economically advantaged. Under the Republican led congress and the influence of Art Pope, the groups look to be under threat from conservatives.
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Record #:
19913
Author(s):
Abstract:
The original budget approved by the House Appropriations subcommittee called for $1.45 million in cuts to the arts. In the late hours of the House session, this amount was amended to $597,000. The Department of Cultural Resources will take the biggest hit, $500,000 and will have to decide where these cuts will be administered.
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Record #:
27928
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Beverly Perdue has released a budget proposal which would cut the corrections budget. As a result, programs such as Harriet’s House would be eliminated. Women who are released from prison may receive help from Harriet’s House which provides women and their children with housing and other basics so the women can readjust to life outside of prison. Former inmates Mae Stephens and Jenee Williams share their stories of how Harriet’s House helped once they left prison and prevented them from relapsing. Budget details, similar programs that will be cut, and the effects of cutting programs are detailed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 19, May 2010, p16-17 Periodical Website
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Record #:
24276
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina witnessed a state budget crisis in 2001 as a result of tax loopholes for businesses and costly support programs. Mike Easley took over as governor after Jim Hunt and had to face the budget crisis by raising taxes and reducing spending.
Record #:
2092
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor James Hunt's tax-cutting proposals to the N.C. General Assembly include a repeal of the intangibles tax, lower corporate income taxes, and sizeable cuts on personal income taxes.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 1, Jan 1995, p31, il
Record #:
1417
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research, reiterating a call first made in 1986, has challenged the Speaker of the House and the President Pro Tem of the Senate to curb the practice of inserting special provisions into budget bills.
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Record #:
1353
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Abstract:
Strong private sector job creation in the second quarter of the fiscal year (Oct.-Dec.) has state withholdings and sales tax revenues running ahead of projections, perhaps providing legislators with as much as a $240 million surplus this spring.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 12, Dec 1993, p1-31, il
Record #:
213
Author(s):
Abstract:
Due to North Carolina's revenue collections, the state budget seems more and more likely to contain a significant surplus.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 5, May 1992, p14, il
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Record #:
29453
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over three-quarters in the fiscal year and North Carolina's budget is showing resilience. With revenue collections on target and spending slightly below appropriation, state officials are expecting to end the year with a positive balancve of $100 million.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 5, May 1992, p14
Record #:
448
Author(s):
Abstract:
The NC legislature convened for the 1991 session with a $1.3 billion gap in money needed for the budget. This article deals with the choices facing the General Assembly as it wrestles with adding and cutting programs and the issue of raising taxes.
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Record #:
27412
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state will cut 400 million dollars from its budget for the fiscal year and almost half will be cut from education. Meanwhile, the highway construction package will receive zero cuts and will cost 9.2 billion dollars. Money could be shifted from the highway fund to prevent cuts in education which provide a greater return on investment than does building roads. NC legislators are unlikely to do this as lobbying is strong, but cutting education spending will likely hurt the students of NC.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 19, May 8-14 1991, p5-6 Periodical Website
Record #:
27414
Author(s):
Abstract:
Facing a severe budget crisis, the NC is cutting funds for mental health services which will affect approximately 900, 000 North Carolinians. According to the Mental Health Study Commission, 600 million is needed for services and those services would save the state money in the long-term. There is bi-partisan support for funding, but it is unlikely to happen with the budget crisis.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 20, May 15-21 1991, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
27413
Author(s):
Abstract:
Children are suffering under economic conditions in NC. One out of four are facing hunger, the number of children suffering from abuse is rising, and the infant mortality rate is higher than the national average. Finding money for programs in the state budget is a matter of priority and legislators need to reevaluate their priorities thinking to help NC’s children
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 19, May 8-14 1991, p7-8 Periodical Website
Record #:
29165
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two major issues face the North Carolina General Assembly for the 1991 session: the budget deficit and redistricting. As these issues define the legislative process for 1991, new roles for key individuals such as the new speaker of the house will also affect the progress made this year.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Jan 1991, p25-26